How to Grow a Hibiscus Indoors

Hibiscus flower image by Gölin Doorneweerd - Swijnenburg/sxc,hu

Overview

An evergreen shrub with abundant flowers, hibiscus is most often planted as a shrub in outdoor landscaping. It is possible to grow hibiscus in containers indoors if you have a spot that receives full sunlight for at least six to eight hours a day. If you live in an area that is too cold in winter for outdoor hibiscus, another option is to move hibiscus outdoors to patios or balconies during the warm months and indoors for winter. Attending to the specific needs of your hibiscus will encourage it to grow healthy and strong, even inside.

Step 1

Use a 10-to-20 inch container with drainage holes in the bottom. Choose the container size based on the size of the hibiscus you purchased.

Step 2

Fill the container a quarter full with broken clay shards or pebbles in the bottom of the pot and then cover in a thin layer of wood shavings. Fill loosely so the filler material does not impede drainage.

Step 3

Fill the pot with well-draining soil. Make your own potting mix that is suited to the special needs of the hibiscus by mixing two parts sandy loam, one part river sand, one part compost and one part peat moss. Commercial potting soil holds too much moisture for hibiscus to grow well in.

Step 4

Plant the hibiscus in the container so the root ball is just covered with soil. Avoid planting so deep that the crown of the plant, where the leaves first emerge, is covered in soil.

Step 5

Keep the soil moist but not soaking-wet at all times. Empty the drip tray beneath the pot after watering so that the container doesn't sit in the old water.

Step 6

Fertilize the hibiscus every two weeks with a soluble fertilizer formulated for hibiscus. Add a one-to-two inch layer of fresh compost on top of the soil every spring for added nutrients.

Step 7

Keep the hibiscus where it receive six to eight hours of full sunlight daily. Place under artificial light 12 to 14 hour daily if natural light is unavailable.

Tips and Warnings

  • Treat mite and aphid infections immediately with insecticide and keep the infected plant away from your other indoor plants.

Things You'll Need

  • Container
  • Clay shards
  • Wood shavings
  • Soil mix
  • Fertilizer
  • Compost

References

  • Hibiscus World
Keywords: container gardening, indoor shrubs, growing hibiscus inside

About this Author

Jenny Harrington has been a freelance writer since 2006. Her published articles have appeared in various print and online publications. Previously, she owned her own business, selling handmade items online, wholesale and at crafts fairs. Harrington's specialties include small business information, crafting, decorating and gardening.

Photo by: Gölin Doorneweerd - Swijnenburg/sxc,hu