How to Grow Hollyhocks in Containers

Beautiful hollyhock bloom. image by Nooks: flickr.com

Overview

Due to the root size and height of traditional hollyhocks, they are not well suited to container growing. However, gardeners can achieve the beauty of traditional hollyhocks with miniature hollyhocks. For best results, use a very large planter, such as a tall whiskey barrel.

Step 1

Place the whiskey barrel in its permanent location in a sunny spot. Once you fill the container with potting soil, it will be too heavy to move. Fill the planting container all the way to the top with potting soil. Hollyhocks grow a very long taproot and need as much root room as possible.

Step 2

Plant the miniature hollyhock seeds in the top of the container in the spring when the temperature is consistently above 70 degrees F. Scatter the seeds lightly over the top of the soil and cover with approximately 1/4 inch of potting soil.

Step 3

Keep the soil's surface evenly moist throughout the growing season, but do not saturate the soil.

Step 4

Cut back the stems to the bottom-most basal leaves after the first bloom to encourage the plant to bloom a second time. The basal leaves are the largest leaves that grow at the base of the plant. Another option is to allow the hollyhocks to grow undisturbed. This will result in the plant self-sowing itself plentifully for the next growing season.

Step 5

Watch for the miniature hollyhocks to grow again the following season in the same container. Depending upon the area surrounding the container, they may also sow themselves in the ground around the container. If this is undesired, dig these plants up and discard them, or relocate them elsewhere.

Things You'll Need

  • Whiskey barrel planter
  • Potting soil
  • Garden shears

References

  • Hollyhocks

Who Can Help

  • Miniature Hollyhocks
Keywords: hollyhock plant, traditional hollyhocks, miniature hollyhock plant

About this Author

Kathryn Hatter is a veteran home-school educator and regular contributor to "Natural News." She is an accomplished gardener, seamstress, quilter, crocheter, painter, cook, decorator and digital graphics creator and she enjoys technical and computer gadgets. Hatter's Internet publications specialize in natural health and she plans to continue her formal education in the health field, focusing on nursing.

Photo by: Nooks: flickr.com