How to Grow Radish

Radishes are among the easiest vegetables to grow. image by Alistair Williamson/sxc.hu

Overview

There is a great variety in radishes, from sweet to hot, in many different colors. Radishes will ripen in three to six weeks from seed planting, making them one of the fastest crops in your garden. Radishes are very easy to grow, making them a good choice for teaching children about gardening.

Step 1

Dig your garden soil to loosen it to a depth of about one foot. Mix in compost with the top three or four inches. Smooth the resulting soil mix with a rake.

Step 2

Plant radish seeds 1 1/2 inches apart in all directions, about 1/2 inch deep, in a block formation. Cover seeds gently with soil and water thoroughly. When seeds are about 1-inch tall, thin them to about 3 inches apart, leaving the stronger seedlings to grow.

Step 3

Water your radishes on a regular basis. Allowing the radish plants to dry out can result in split roots and very hot radishes. Water until the ground is completely soaked, but not fulled with puddles. When the ground has dried completely about an inch below the surface, water again. Weed regularly and watch for pests in the leaves.

Step 4

Pull radishes from the ground when they are a good size for your salad or plate. Larger radishes aren't necessarily better, as they are frequently woody and not as tasty as their smaller counterparts.

Step 5

Store radishes in a cool, dry place, layered on straw or sawdust if you wish to keep them all winter. For short term storage, cut off the tops and store in plastic bags in the vegetable compartment in your refrigerator.

Things You'll Need

  • Shovel
  • Rake
  • Radish seeds

References

  • National Gardening Association
  • Tips for avoiding radishes with all tops and little root
Keywords: plant radish, grow radish, radish plant

About this Author

Anne Baley is a writer and photographer living in Southeast Michigan. She has written numerous articles about places she has discovered while traveling throughout the United States. Baley's work has appeared in a variety of online outlets, including Endless Sunday.

Photo by: Alistair Williamson/sxc.hu