How to Keep Rabbits Out of Vegetable Gardens

Rabbits also love to eat clover. image by Oshinn Reid: sxc.hu

Overview

Growing a vegetable garden is a great way to provide you and your family with fresh, healthy and often organic vegetables during the summer months. Alas, you may have rabbits who think that the vegetable garden is for them also. Fortunately, there are few techniques that can get those rabbits to stop munching on your vegetables.

Step 1

Determine what kind of rabbit is invading your vegetable garden. You probably either have a jackrabbit or a cottontail rabbit. Jackrabbits are larger and typically have a black tail. The cottontail rabbit is smaller and has a white, fluffy tail, like a cotton ball.

Step 2

Build a fence. If your bothersome rabbit is a cottontail, construct it 2 feet high. It it's a jackrabbit, construct the fence 3 feet high. Use wire or poultry wire with small fence posts every few feet. You can also install an electric fence, which can easily be removed once your rabbit situation is under control.

Step 3

Deter the rabbits from your vegetable garden. Fox urine, dried blood or human hair sprinkled around the perimeter of your garden may keep the rabbits out of your garden. You can also soak corn cobs with vinegar and place them around the perimeter of the garden or around the plants they are eating.

Step 4

Entice the rabbits to eat or go somewhere else. Plant clover in another area of your yard and the rabbits may eat them instead of your vegetables. In addition, clean up your yard of wild brush, stone piles and other areas the rabbits may be residing.

Things You'll Need

  • Wire fencing
  • Posts
  • Fox urine
  • Dried blood
  • Human hair
  • Corn cobs
  • Vinegar

References

  • Emmitsburg.net
  • VegetableGardener.com
Keywords: deter rabbits garden, stop rabbits garden, munching rabbits

About this Author

Melissa Lewis is a former elementary classroom teacher and media specialist. She has also written for various online publications. Lewis holds a Bachelor of Arts in psychology from the University of Maryland Baltimore County.

Photo by: Oshinn Reid: sxc.hu