How to Cut Fresh Flowers

Overview

Fresh flowers are cut and removed from a plant once they are in full bloom and all thorns are trimmed. Fresh-cut flowers often are sold at flower and boutique stores for gifts. Popular types of cut flowers include roses, gerberas, chrysanthemums, tulips, lilies and carnations. A fresh-cut flower should exhibit a sweet fragrance of the flower and be properly cut so that vase life of the flower is extended. If a flower is cut improperly, it can decrease the lifespan of the flower and make it less valuable on the market.

Step 1

Cut your flowers in the morning when the blossoms are freshest and when the content of sugar is highest. If you are unable to cut the flowers in the morning, cut them when it is coolest outside.

Step 2

Use a sharp knife start to cut the stem at a 45-degree angle. Cut slowly and carefully, making sure not to slice up the inside of the stem. Make sure to cut at least 3/4-inch from the bottom of the stem.

Step 3

Immediately transfer the flower to a bucket of lukewarm water. Air bubbles can form in the stems if you don't do this right away and will prevent water from absorbing into the flower.

Step 4

Wait for a 30 minutes and transfer the fresh cut flowers to a vase. Make sure the vase is filled enough only to cover the stems. Remove any leaves from the stem before putting in the vase.

Step 5

Cut the stems again after two to three days as needed. Take the flowers out of the vase and twist a thin rubber band near the top of the stem. Cut the stems again 3/4-inch from the bottom and place into a clean vase with fresh water.

Things You'll Need

  • Sharp knife
  • Bucket
  • Vase
  • Rubber band

References

  • Fresh Flower Care
  • Cutting Fresh Flowers
  • Cut Flowers
Keywords: cut fresh flowers, trimming flowers, cutting roses

About this Author

Greg Lindberg is a graduate of Purdue University with a Bachelor of Liberal Arts degree in creative writing. His professional writing experience includes three years of technical writing for an agriculture IT department and a major pharmaceutical company, as well as four years as staff writer for a music and film webzine.