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How to Sprout Chia Seeds

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How to Sprout Chia Seeds

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Many chia forms resemble animals. image by Jeremy Noble: flickr.com

Overview

Chia is a mucilaginous microgreen---when wet, the seed forms a slippery gel sack around, then produces small sprouts. Often grown on terra-cotta or clay forms that are filled with water, the chia sprouts resemble hair on the forms. The seeds grow on the outside of the form instead of inside a pot. Chia sprouts are edible, with a taste similar to watercress. Grow them as an ornamental, a food crop or as a sprouting experiment with children.

Step 1

Place 2 tsp. of chia seeds in a small bowl. Add ¼ cup of water. Stir after 15 minutes to ensure all seeds are exposed to the water, then let them soak for 24 hours.

Step 2

Fill a larger bowl with water and set the chia form inside. Allow it soak for 24 hours, then remove it from the bowl.

Step 3

Scoop seeds from the bowl with a knife or spatula. Smear onto the grooves on the top of the chia form. Spread evenly and thinly; areas with a thick seed covering may not sprout properly.

Step 4

Set the form on a drip tray, then fill the form with water through the hole in the top or rear of the form. Refill daily as necessary and discard unused water in the drip tray. Seeds will sprout in 3 to 5 days.

Step 5

Place the chia form in a sunny window after the majority of seeds have sprouted. Harvest, if desired, by cutting off the sprouts from just above the growing medium.

Tips and Warnings

  • Fuzz beyond the first week after planting is mildew. Scrub the seeds from the form and soak in 1 gallon of water with 1 tbsp. of bleach before replanting.

Things You'll Need

  • Chia form
  • Bowls
  • Knife
  • Drip tray

References

  • Carolina Pet Supply
  • Sprout People
Keywords: chia pets, salvia hispanica, sprouting chia seeds

About this Author

Jenny Harrington has been a freelance writer since 2006. Her published articles have appeared in various print and online publications. Previously, she owned her own business, selling handmade items online, wholesale and at crafts fairs. Harrington's specialties include small business information, crafting, decorating and gardening.

Photo by: Jeremy Noble: flickr.com