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How to Grow Eggplants

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How to Grow Eggplants

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Grow eggplants in a garden for a delicious vegetable harvest. image by xandert: morguefile.com

Overview

Gardeners searching for something interesting or unusual to grow might consider adding an eggplant or two to the home garden. Eggplant grows easily for most and is similar to green pepper plants. Place eggplants in the garden when all threat of frost has passed. With proper attention and care, you will enjoy a beautiful harvest in the second half of the summer.

Step 1

Prepare a sunny growling location by adding the starter fertilizer to the top of the soil. Consult the fertilizer package and apply the amount recommended for your growing area. Work the fertilizer into the soil completely.

Step 2

Dig holes for the seedlings that are large enough that the seedlings will be at the same depth as they are in the temporary pots. Space small eggplant varieties 12 to 18 inches apart and space large eggplant varieties 18 to 24 inches apart.

Step 3

Place the eggplant seedlings into the prepared holes and fill-in the soil around the seedlings firmly. Water the seedlings generously.

Step 4

Fertilize the eggplants approximately 30 days after transplanting by adding granular nitrogen fertilizer along the sides of the plants. Follow the package for the recommended amounts and make sure you keep the fertilizer several inches away from the plants to prevent burning. Water after fertilizing. Fertilize again in the same way after you harvest the first eggplant.

Step 5

Harvest the eggplants when they are between 6 and 8 inches long and the skin is glossy. Cut the eggplants from the stems with the utility knife. Handle the eggplants carefully because they are fragile.

Tips and Warnings

  • Determine if an eggplant is ripe by pressing your thumb into its side. If the skin indents and pops back quickly, it is ripe. If the skin will not indent, the eggplant is not ripe. If the skin indents and does not pop back out, it is over-ripe.

Things You'll Need

  • Starter and nitrogen fertilizer
  • Spade
  • Trowel
  • Eggplant seedlings
  • Water
  • Utility knife
  • Gloves

References

  • Eggplants
Keywords: eggplant, growing eggplants, harvesting eggplant

About this Author

Kathryn Hatter is a veteran home-school educator and regular contributor to "Natural News." She is an accomplished gardener, seamstress, quilter, crocheter, painter, cook, decorator and digital graphics creator and she enjoys technical and computer gadgets. Hatter's Internet publications specialize in natural health and she plans to continue her formal education in the health field, focusing on nursing.

Photo by: xandert: morguefile.com

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