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Growing Frangipani Indoors

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Growing Frangipani Indoors

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Growing Frangipani Indoors image by http://www.desert-tropicals.com/Plants/Apocynaceae/Plumeria_acutifolia.jpg

Overview

Though not native to Hawaii, one would never know as the frangipani tree is very common there. So common, in fact, that the flowers are often used to make leis. The frangipani tree is originally native to South America, but has been transported all over the world. These trees have beautiful white flowers seemingly constantly in bloom, yet they are easy to grow.

Step 1

Take a piece from an established frangipani tree. These cuttings can be sold pre-cut, but if you have to cut the piece yourself be sure to wear gloves as the sap from this tree can burn the skin. Cut a piece that is at least 6 inches long.

Step 2

Set the cutting in a cool dry place and allow it to dry out and heal the cut edge.

Step 3

Fill a large pot with a mixture of two parts soil to one part sand. Plant the cutting in the pot by simply sticking it into the dirt, about an inch deep.

Step 4

Water the cutting every two weeks until it has grown roots.

Step 5

Keep the plant near a sunny window. Optimally franipani need at least six hours of sunlight a day.

Tips and Warnings

  • Setting your tree outside during the summer months will help it flourish, but be careful in the winter as cold weather and frost can easily damage the frangipani. The tree will become dormant when the temperature goes below 50 degrees.

Things You'll Need

  • Large pot
  • Soil
  • Sand
  • Slow-release fertilizer

References

  • Growing Frangipani Trees
  • Frangipani Tree, Temple Tree
  • Frangipani Flower
Keywords: frangipani, grow, indoors

About this Author

Melynda Sorrels spent 10 years in the military working in different capacities of the medical field, including dental assisting, health services administration, decontamination and urgent medical care. Awarded the National Guardsman’s Medal for Lifesaving efforts in 2002, Sorrels was also a nominee for a Red Cross Award and a certified EMT-B for four years.

Photo by: http://www.desert-tropicals.com/Plants/Apocynaceae/Plumeria_acutifolia.jpg