How to Grow Rosemary

How to Grow Rosemary

Introduction

Even if you never consume a single sprig of rosemary, its blue-green, needlelike foliage and compelling fragrance make this tender perennial a must in any garden.

Instructions

Difficulty: Moderately Easy

Growing Rosemary in Warm Climates (USDA Zones 8 Through 10)


Things You'll Need

  • Cactus Potting Soil
  • Garden Spades
  • Planting Containers
  • Rosemary Plants

Steps

Step One

Buy started plants at the nursery for best results; seeds germinate slowly and erratically - and then only when they're very fresh.

Step Two


Choose a site that gets full sun or very light afternoon shade and has excellent drainage (raised beds are ideal). Rosemary prefers poor to average soil with a pH of 6.5 to 7.0.

Step Three


Plant at any time, setting transplants into the ground at the same depth they were growing in their nursery pots. Leave at least 2 feet all around to ensure good air circulation.

Step Four


Clip leaves or sprigs anytime you need them.

Tips & Warnings

  • Plant rosemary where you intend it to stay; it resents being moved.
  • For the best selection - and to be sure of what you're getting - buy rosemary plants from an herb specialist. Large, general-interest garden centers often don't label specific varieties, which come in several foliage forms and bear flowers of either white, pink, deep blue or light blue.
  • Rosemary repels cabbage moths and bean beetles.

Growing Rosemary in Cooler Climates (USDA Zone 7 and North)


Steps

Step One

Buy started plants at the nursery for planting in early spring.

Step Two

Use a clay pot that measures at least 12 inches deep and 12 inches across and has plenty of drainage holes.

Step Three

Fill it with a light, coarse potting mix, such as cactus soil with a handful of perlite added. Set the plants into their new quarters at the same depth they were growing in their nursery pots.

Step Four

Harden off plants when all danger of frost has passed, then move them outdoors (see "How to Harden Off Seedlings").

Step Five

Water regularly, keeping the soil slightly moist but never wet. During spring and early summer, feed plants monthly with compost tea.

Step Six

Bring the plants back inside well before the first frost and put them in a sunny south- or west-facing window. If winter sunlight is scarce in your house, augment the supply with fluorescent lights.

Step Seven

Keep the soil moist and mist the plants at least twice a week with tepid water.

Step Eight

Clip leaves or sprigs anytime you need them.

Article courtesy of eHow.com

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