How To Photograph Flowers, Part 8

How To Photograph Flowers, Part 8

Showing droplets. Here's a tip from Sharon Gumerove, NYI's Webmaster, who loves to photograph flowers: If possible, show droplets of dew on a close-up view of a flower. The dew connotes an early morning view in a quiet garden. In fact, we used to get up extra early just to capture that dew. Then Sharon told us a trick she learned a while back: She gets up late and brings along a spray bottle filled with water and creates her own "dew" any time of day! As an alternative, some photographers use drops of glycerine (bought at the local drug store) because it won't evaporate as fast.

The main idea we want to impart to you in this article is that there are lots of opportunities for you to experiment when you photograph flowers. Look for creative and unexpected approaches. For example, we've seen interesting photographs of dead flowers, dried flowers, out-of-focus flowers, even underwater flowers. Point: Let your imagination roam. Most flower pictures are mundane. Look for the unusual. Experiment!

The more you experiment, the more interesting, exciting and gratifying your flower pictures will be.

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