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Compare John Deere Vs. Cub Cadet Mowers

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Compare John Deere Vs. Cub Cadet Mowers

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Overview

John Deere and Cub Cadet mowers are known for quality performance and durability. The John Deere 100 Series features cruise control for a steady speed and an even cut, as well as electric engagement system for the mower blades. The Select Series had a wider stance for stability and extra large tires for better traction, in addition to a foot pedal that locks the rear transaxle for even more traction. The Cub Cadet Series 1000 has a tight turning radius to make turns quickly and easily and an advanced cutting system for a smoother lawn. The Series 2000 is easy and comfortable to use with electric power steering, cruise control and a foot-controlled automatic transmission.

John Deere 100 Series

Designed for yards up to 2 ½ acres, the John Deere 100 Series mowers are smaller and easier to maneuver than the Select Series models. The mowers have five-speed transmissions and single cylinder or V-twin Briggs and Stratton engines. A high capacity filtering system provides cleaner and smoother operation of the engine. The 100 Series mowers have solid one-piece 12-gauge frames, stamped decks, heavy-duty crankshafts and cast iron front axles for durability. They are equipped with the Edge Cutting System, a three-in-one deck that discharges, mulches or bags. The cutting width varies from 42 to 54 inches.

John Deer Select Series

The John Deere Select Series, with larger bodies and more powerful engines than the 100 Series, is designed for larger yards and uneven terrain. They feature a Traction Assist Pedal, which locks the rear transaxle so that both rear wheels work together in muddy areas or on hills. Some models are equipped with four-wheel drive and steering. The Select Series mowers have twin touch automatic transmissions and V-twin or three-cylinder engines. The I-Torque Power System on some models of the Select Series combines engine and hood design for better cooling of the engine. The cutting width varies from 38 to 62 inches, and some models feature the Edge Mulch Deck. Some models also have power lifts for attachments.

Cub Cadet Series 1000

The Cub Cadet Series 1000 is designed for small yards up to three acres with many obstacles. It has a tight turning radius for more maneuverability than the Series 2000 mowers. The Series 1000 mowers are equipped with professional grade engines The Series 1000 has an advanced cutting system with high lift blades that are rigid and do not flex when mowing at high speeds or in severe conditions. The deck is designed for optimal grass lift and has a wide discharge chute. The mowers are available with 42- or 46-inch twin blades or 50- or 54-inch triple blades.

Cub Cadet Series 2000

More powerful and heavy duty, the Cub Cadet Series 2000 mowers are designed for larger areas up to five acres. They have cast-iron, hydrostatic transmissions and professional grade engines. The direct shaft drive system has no belts to break or slip. The Series 2000 mowers are available with 48-, 50- or 54-inch triple blades, or 42-inch twin blades. Decks are available in stamped or fabricated metal, and some are equipped with electronic deck lifts.

Warranty and Repair

The John Deere 100 Series mowers have a two-year or 120 operating hour limited warranty. The Select Series mowers have a four-year or 300 operating hour limited warranty. The Cub Cadet Series 1000 mowers have a three-year or 120 operating hour limited warranty, or a five-year or 500 operating hour limited warranty. The Cub Cadet Series 2000 mowers have a four-year or 300 operating hour limited warranty, or a five-year or 500 operating hour limited warranty.

Keywords: John Deere mowers, Cub Cadet mowers, compare mowers

About this Author

Melody Lee began working as a reporter and copywriter for the "Jasper News" in 2004 and was promoted to editor in 2005. She also edits magazine articles and books. Lee holds a degree in landscape design, is a Florida Master Gardener, and has more than 25 years of gardening experience.