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How to Treat Wounds on an Avocado Tree

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How to Treat Wounds on an Avocado Tree

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Overview

Avocado trees are one of the most sensitive fruit trees, requiring care and nurturing that not all fruit trees need. Of particular concern for avocado trees are parasites, including insects and fungi, that can damage the sensitive structure of your tree. Wounds to the trunk of your tree--any place where the bark is interrupted and the inner soft wood is exposed--are particularly dangerous, often leading to decay and death. There are simple ways you can help your wounded tree heal.

Step 1

Cut the dead bark away from the wound area on your avocado tree, trying to maintain an oblong shape. Remove enough bark to get to a place where healthy bark and wood meet.

Step 2

Apply an asphalt-based tree wound treatment to the exposed area. This will seal the wood underneath and help to prevent parasites, fungi and insects from attacking the inside of your avocado tree's trunk.

Step 3

Prune the remainder of the tree to remove dead or drying branches and leaves, to allow the tree to concentrate all its energy on healing.

Step 4

Consult with your local nursery or agriculture extension office to determine the best care regimen for your wounded avocado tree--including feeding and watering--and follow their instructions

Step 5

Determine what wounded your tree and prevent future damage, if possible.

Things You'll Need

  • Sharp knife
  • Asphalt-based tree wound treatment
  • Pruning sheers

References

  • Walter Clark and Son: About Tree Wound Dressing
  • AgriLife Extension: Home Fruit Production--Avocado
Keywords: avacado trees, tree wounds, preventing tree decay

About this Author

Lucinda Gunnin began writing in 1988 for the “Milford Times." Her work has appeared in “Illinois Issues” and dozens more newspapers, magazines and online outlets. Gunnin holds a Bachelor of Arts in English and political science from Adams State College and a Master of Arts in public affairs reporting from the University of Illinois at Springfield.

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