How to Dry a Statice Flower

Overview

Statice flowers dry exceptionally well and complement flower arrangements because of their neutral colors of white, lavender and pink. The tiny, delicate, funnel-shaped flowers dry faster than larger flowers and are easier to handle without becoming damaged during the drying process. Statice flowers bloom in spring and summer and you can enjoy them throughout the fall and winter by drying them for use in a floral arrangement. The drying process is extremely easy and is a satisfying learning experience for children to create something beautiful that is on display for years to come.

Step 1

Select statice flowers just before the peak of maturity, while the petal structure is as firm as possible. Choose flowers without blemishes which become more pronounced in the drying process.

Step 2

Pick the statice flowers at the peak of maturity in mid-afternoon when the petals are completely dry. Snip the stem off with pruning shears 2 inches from the base of the statice flower.

Step 3

Choose a shallow container that is wide enough to accommodate as many statice flowers as possible with a lid that will seal air-tight. Fill the bottom of the container with 2 inches of silica gel crystals, available at hobby stores.

Step 4

Set the statice flowers side by side, without touching each other, on top of the silica gel. Gently sprinkle more silica gel over the flowers until they are completely covered. Get the silica gel between the petals while maintaining the natural shape of the flower.

Step 5

Seal the container tightly and allow the statice flowers to dry for at least two weeks. When dry, the flowers are fragile, so handle them carefully. Use florist wire, if desired, to add length to the stems.

Tips and Warnings

  • Choose flowers that have not been exposed to pesticides or insecticides.

Things You'll Need

  • Pruning shears
  • Container, lid
  • Silica gel

References

  • University of Nebraska Extension: Drying Flowers
Keywords: dry statice flowers, saving statis flowers, statis flowers preservation

About this Author

Freelance writing since 2009, Tom Ross has 30 years of corporate management and hands-on experience in the supermarket industry. Ross was featured on the cover of "Instore Buyer" magazine and his articles have appeared on eHow.