How to Grow Bermuda Seeds

Overview

A homeowner wishing to improve her lawn or start a new one has three options: sod, plugs and seeding. Seeding is cost-effective when compared with the cost of sod to cover the same amount of area. Seeding Bermuda grass is useful for supplementing an existing lawn or planting a lawn from scratch when the outside air reaches 80 to 90 degrees Fahrenheit. Starting a lawn with Bermuda seeds takes time but provides for a thick, lush lawn.

Step 1

Soak the area to be planted lightly and allow it to set overnight. This will reduce the dust and loosen the ground slightly for tilling.

Step 2

Till up the ground completely with a garden tiller until the top layer of soil is pulverized to at least 4 inches deep.

Step 3

Rake the area to be planted with a garden or leaf rake to level the ground and remove all vegetation, including roots, from the soil.

Step 4

Fill the spreader with Bermuda grass seeds and adjust the discharge gate to distribute seed at a rate of 3 lbs. per 1,000 square feet. Spread grass seed evenly along the area while traveling back and forth from end to end. Once the entire area is covered in one direction, spread grass seed in the same manner by crossing back and forth in opposite direction.

Step 5

Cover the planted grass seed approximately 1/4 inch below the soil, using a garden or leaf rake. Bermuda grass seed likely will not germinate unless it is completely covered. Keep the soil moist for 10 to 14 days by watering the area two to three times per day. Seeds will begin to sprout and break the surface of the soil in approximately two weeks.

Things You'll Need

  • Garden tiller
  • Seed spreader
  • Garden rake
  • Lawn watering hose

References

  • Texas A&M University: Bermuda Grass
  • Seedland: Planting Bermuda Grass Seed
Keywords: grow bermuda seeds, plant bermuda grass, bermuda grass seeds

About this Author

Damon Hildebrand is a retired U.S. Navy veteran. He has more than 15 years within the oil and gas industry in both technical and managerial positions. Hildebrand has been a technical writer and communicator for the last four years. He is a certified specialists in lubrication and tribology, as well as a certified maintenance and reliability professional.