How to Keep Gerbera Daisies Alive

Overview

Approximately 30 species of gerbera daisies are native to Africa, tropical Asia and South America. Blooming year-round indoors and in temperate climates outdoors, gerbera daisies are reasonably hardy plants that can be grown by anyone with proper care. Most daisy plants last for approximately three years, after which it is best to discard them and start with new plants.

Step 1

Select healthy plants that are sturdy and bug-free with green foliage and brightly colored flowers. Pick plants with buds in addition to flowers.

Step 2

Plant in a sunny location. In extremely hot areas, such as Southern states, gerbera daisies require partial shade, but in most places daisies thrive in full sunlight.

Step 3

Provide excellent drainage. Gerbera daisies planted outdoors do well planted on a slope. If grown on level ground, make sure the soil drains well. If much clay is in the soil, mix in compost to help drainage. For daisies planted in pots, make sure the pots have drainage holes.

Step 4

Water sparingly. Gerbera daisies thrive in soil that is moist but not wet. Allow the soil to dry between waterings.

Step 5

Feed gerbera daisies every two weeks. Water-soluble fertilizer works best.

Step 6

Clip off dead flowers. This not only makes the plant look healthy, it also encourages the development of new flowers.

Things You'll Need

  • Gerbera daisies
  • Compost
  • Water-soluble fertilizer
  • Garden clippers

References

  • National Gardening Association: NGA Plant Finder Gerbera Jamesonii
  • AA Florist: Growing Gerbera Daisies
  • Gerbera.org
  • Ken's Flowers: Plant Care Tips
Keywords: gerbera daisies, grow gerbera daisies, gerber daisies

About this Author

Rebecca Moore has been a writer since 1994. She has been published on Associated Content, Suite101, eHow and numerous print magazines. Moore attended Living Word Bible College and Leeward Community College. Moore enjoys spending time at garden shops and botanical gardens and experimenting with hydroponics and square foot gardening.