How to Prepare Soy Flour

Overview

Soy flour is a wholesome, nutrient-rich ingredient that is used to make meat alternatives, dairy alternatives and baked goods. Since it is a natural source of protein, dietary fiber and isoflavones, soy flour can greatly enrich any food it is added to. Although it cannot fully replace wheat flour in recipes, there are many advantages to baking with soy flour. When combined with regular wheat flour, soy flour can extend the shelf life of baked goods, enhance their texture and boost their protein content. It can also be used in fried foods to reduce the absorption of fat. Soy flour commonly retails in natural food stores, but it can also be prepared at home with mature soybeans. There are two standard practices for milling soybeans, the wet heat and dry heat methods. Both are simple techniques that use a conventional kitchen oven. While the wet heat method involves blanching and slow-roasting the soybeans, the dry heat method entails soaking and quick-baking the soybeans.

Wet Heat Method

Step 1

Preheat your oven to 200Farenheit.

Step 2

Measure five cups of water for each cup of soybeans and bring to a boil in a pot. When the water starts to boil, add a pinch of baking soda and then add the soybeans. Simmer for 20 to 25 minutes.

Step 3

Drain and rinse the blanched soybeans in cool water.

Step 4

Spread the soybeans in a single layer on a baking sheet. Add them to the oven and roast for one hour or more. Stir occasionally.

Step 5

After the roasted soybeans have cooled, add the beans to a grain mill or blender. Blend until it reaches the fine consistency of flour.

Dry Heat Method

Step 1

Preheat your oven to 350Farenheit.

Step 2

Soak your beans in water that is several times their volume. Drain after eight hours.

Step 3

Spread the soybeans in a single layer on a baking sheet. Add them to the oven and bake for 25 minutes. Stir occasionally.

Step 4

After the baked soybeans have cooled, add the beans to a grain mill or blender. Blend until it reaches the fine consistency of flour.

Tips and Warnings

  • Since any dough with soy flour has a tendency to brown faster, the baking process should always be closely monitored. Although soy flour is a protein-rich ingredient, it lacks gluten -- the specific protein that gives baked goods their structure. As a result, it is not recommended to substitute more than 25% of grain flours with soy flour. Nonetheless, even modest ratios of soy flour to wheat flour can dramatically increase the protein content of baked goods. For instance, a yeast-raised bread with 12% soy flour and 88% wheat flour has a 40% higher protein content than pure wheat bread. (See Reference 2)

Things You'll Need

  • Water
  • Baking soda
  • Mature soybeans, debris removed
  • Baking sheet
  • Grain mill or blender

References

  • Soyfoods Association of North America
  • Illinois Center for Soy Foods
Keywords: soybeans, flour, baking, protein, gluten
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