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How to Use Saccharin

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How to Use Saccharin

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Overview

When trying to alter your recipes to be sugar-free, you have a number of choices of sugar substitutes. One of the oldest and most common is saccharin. This product is widely available on the market under one of its brand names: Sweet'N Low. Other manufacturers also make saccharin sugar substitutes, but they are usually packaged in a box the same shade of pink as Sweet'N Low. No matter what brand of saccharin you have, you can use it as a substitute for sugar in many applications.

Step 1

Assess your recipes for the amount of sugar required. You can replace all of this in most cooking applications with saccharin. Cakes, cookies and candy, where sugar is used to provide bulk to the finished product, you can replace 1/3 to 1/2 of the sugar with saccharin. For instance, a cake recipe that requires 1 cup sugar, you should use 1/2 cup sugar and 12 packets of saccharin.

Step 2

Find the amount of sugar you need to replace on a conversion chart, and then refer to the amount of saccharin you need to substitute. Generally, one packet of saccharin is equal to 2 tsp. of sugar. This translates to six packets per 1/4 cup of sugar in a recipe.

Step 3

Taste your recipe before serving. Add more saccharin if it is needed.

Step 4

Use recipes that already require saccharin to avoid having to replace sugar. Follow the directions in the recipe. These have been tested to ensure that the amounts of saccharin will provide adequate sweetness (see Resources).

Step 5

Use saccharin to sweeten drinks in the same proportions that you would use in cooking.

Who Can Help

  • Sweet'N Low Substitution Chart
  • Sweet'N Low Recipes
Keywords: saccharin, sugar, substitute, Sweet'N, Low, sugar, free, cooking

About this Author

Athena Hessong began her freelance writing career in 2004. She draws upon experiences and knowledge gained from teaching all high school subjects for seven years. Hessong earned a Bachelor in Arts in history from the University of Houston.

Article provided by eHow Home & Garden | How to Use Saccharin