Maryland Crab Soup Nutrition

Overview

Maryland crab soup is a classic coastal dish that features crab in a soup of multiple ingredients including tomatoes and chicken broth. Differing from a chowder, crab soup is a healthier and nutritious way to enjoy crab. While there are many possible ingredients in crab soup, certain ingredients help to define the nutrition of crab soup.

Crab Meat

Crab meat is the star of Maryland crab soup. Blue crab is often used and offers protein to the meal. One cup of blue crab will bring 24 g of protein to the soup. This is almost 50 percent of your daily recommended amount of protein. At the same time, one cup of crab meat has nearly 40 percent of your daily amount of cholesterol. Crab meat does manage to keep the soup low in fat, as one serving of crab only has 2 g of fat. Crab meat is a good source of multiple vitamins and minerals including vitamin B12, vitamin B6, phosphorus, zinc and copper.

Tomatoes and Potatoes

Tomatoes and potatoes are important parts of Maryland crab soup. They are chopped and added to the broth to add texture to the soup. Potatoes have a lot to offer the meal. One potato alone has 45 percent of your daily recommended amount of vitamin C. The potato will also add 18 percent of your daily recommended amount of potassium to the soup. Tomatoes add another 40 percent of your daily value of vitamin C, with one serving being one medium tomato.

Corn and Beans

One medium ear of sweet corn adds only 90 calories to the soup. Corn is also moderately high in vitamin C, with 10 percent of your daily value. Corn also adds eight percent of your daily amount of dietary fiber. While there are multiple types of beans added to the soup, lima beans are the most prevalent. One cup of lima beans will bring over 135 percent of your daily value of dietary fiber and 74 percent of your daily value of iron to your Maryland crab soup.

Cabbage

Cabbage adds important greens to the soup, making it even more nutritious. One serving of cabbage (one cup) adds nine percent of your daily value of dietary fiber to the soup. Cabbage also ups the vitamin C content of the soup, with over 50 percent of your daily value in one serving of cabbage. Cabbage also adds over 80 percent of your daily amount of vitamin K.

Other Vegetables

Carrots and celery are both added to Maryland crab soup. Celery adds bulk without adding calories, as two full stalks only have 15 calories. One seven-inch long carrot adds over 100 percent of your daily value of vitamin A to the soup.

Keywords: maryland crab soup, blue crab, nutrition

About this Author

Todd Burton has been freelance writing for three years and has been published on multiple websites including Associated Content. Burton is currently wrapping up his bachelor's degree in advertising and public relations.

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