How to Make a Snowman Out of Paper

Overview

If your holiday exterior decorating plans include a semi-permanent snowman that you can dress up yourself, you might try your hand at making one at home out of paper. While the supplies you will need are relatively inexpensive, depending on the size of your snowman, you may need a lot of them. This snowman will hold up well in mild, dry weather but if real snow is in the forecast you'll need to give it shelter. This project may take up to a week to finish due to drying time.

Step 1

Shred the paper. You can use any kind of scrap white paper. Heavily-printed paper such as newspaper may look gray rather than white, however it is usable for a "dirty snow" effect. Oil your shredder frequently as you shred so the motor does not overheat from the motion. When you have enough paper to fill a large trash bag you can begin the project.

Step 2

Form three spheres out of the poultry netting using the pliers to turn in the edges where they form a seam. Make a large sphere for the base, a head-sized one for the top, and a medium-sized one to link the head and body. The size of your first sphere will determine the proportions of the other two. Smaller base spheres will require less propping.

Step 3

Staple the base sphere into the plywood base or use the U-shaped nails to tack it down. Don't worry if the sphere becomes deformed as you fasten on--you can reshape it later. Prop the body sphere on top of the base sphere and tie them together with twist-ties or string. Do the same with the head sphere on top of the body. If your base sphere sinks a lot from the weight of the other spheres, you may need to bolster it with a rod screwed in to the plywood perpendicular at the exact center. If your middle or head spheres seem to need support due to their sizes, try using a coat hanger unbent and threaded into the wire gaps.

Step 4

Mix the paper mache paste (3/4 white glue to 1/4 water) and moisten a handful of paper in it at a time. Squeeze off the extra paste and then quickly and gently press the paper against the poultry wire base. Repeat for the entire base. Don't use too much paper or glue or the wire will become deformed and bent in from the weight. Carefully reshape it if you can while the paste is still wet or else you won't be able to make repairs. Allow the base to dry completely to provide stability to the body sphere, and then next paper mache the middle. Drying time will vary based on how much glue you used and how humid the environment is. Let the project dry, overnight at a minimum, between steps--when dry it should sound hollow when you tap it. After the middle dries completely, begin top sphere. If you have bumps or dents that need to be corrected, apply another layer of paper mache to the entire snowman after the three sections are complete.

Step 5

Apply a coat of polyurethane to the snowman to protect it against insects and minor humidity.

Step 6

Decorate the snowman's face with paint, paper scraps, or buttons. You do not need to use a carrot for the nose--rolled up orange paper will suffice for the season. Dress the snowman in a scarf and knit hat.

Tips and Warnings

  • Avoid using shredded bills and financial records to protect your security. Although they will be disfigured and glued, it is possible for people to piece together information from small scraps if they're motivated.

Things You'll Need

  • Paper shredder
  • Waste white paper (enough for shreds to fill a yard waste bag)
  • Roll of poultry netting
  • Pliers
  • 3-foot by 3-foot piece of plywood
  • U-shaped nails with hammer or staple gun
  • Twist ties or string
  • Paper mache paste
  • Quart of polyurethane

References

  • DLTK's Craft for Kids

Who Can Help

  • Paper Mache Recipes
Keywords: holiday paper snowman, make a large paper mache snowman, christmas paper snowman

About this Author

Margaret Bryant is a long-time resident of North Carolina. She has recently written extensively for GolfLink and eHow. She has been writing for publication since 1999. Bryant holds a Bachelor of Arts in English language/literature.

Article provided by eHow Home & Garden | How to Make a Snowman Out of Paper