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Fruit Tree Farming in New England

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Fruit Tree Farming in New England

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Overview

New England is an ideal climate region for growing a variety of fruit trees, such as apples and peaches. Fruit is grown in every state within the region, from Maine blueberries to Rhode Island apples. Fruit orchards thrive due to the cool climates and nutrient-rich soil that's perfect for hardier types of trees that can handle the tough winters.

Apples

There are at least 40 types of apples that are grown and harvest in the New England states. According to the New England Apple Growers Association, most of these are on family-owned orchards. A few varieties available include Empire, Cortland and McIntosh red apples.

Orchards

The New England Apple Grower's association has listed over 120 pick-your-own apple orchards in the New England area alone. The orchards are listed by state and are mostly open and available for picking during late Summer or Labor Day until Christmas Day each year.

Peaches

Most peaches are grown as a supporting crop throughout New England, with apples being the primary crop. Main New England varieties include the Red Haven peach, Ernie's Choice, Madison, Cresthaven, and Garnet Beauty peaches.

Other Fruit Trees

Apples and pears are not the only crops available in New England. Wild blueberries are harvested in the wild, while nurseries like Countrybrook Farms in New Hampshire offer three species of pears, three varieties of cherry and nine different species of crabapples.

Considerations

Due to the potential damage from local pathogens and their impact on the crops of the region, many organizations have arisen to provide useful information on fruit and berry crop diseases. Such organizations like the Tree Fruit and Berry Pathology Group at Cornell University in New York help farmers prevent the spread of dangerous pathogens like apple-rust rot.

Keywords: New England fruit, fruit tree orchards, New England orchards

About this Author

Jonathan Budzinski started his writing career in 2007. His work appears on websites such as eHow and WordGigs. Budzinski specializes in nonprofit topics, as he spent two years with Basic Rights Oregon and WomanSpace. He has received recognition as a Shining Star Talent Scholar in English while studying English at the University of Oregon.