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How to Make an Apple Press

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How to Make an Apple Press

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Overview

An apple press (or cider press) is used to press freshly picked apples and extract the juice by applying high amounts of pressure. You can ferment the finished juice to create cider or concentrate and can it to provide the family with fresh juice all year. Compost the peels and cores along with any other organic material and use it to fertilize the apple tree and any other plants in your garden.

The Basket

Step 1

Cut the slats for the basket out of the 5/8-by-12-by-40-inch maple board with a jigsaw. The slats should be 5/8 inch thick and 1 inch wide.

Step 2

Drill 1/4-inch holes every 1 3/16 inches apart into the metal straps. Place the first hole 19/32 inch away from the end of the strip.

Step 3

Wrap the strips around a 12-inch diameter bucket and clamp them in place.

Step 4

Spot weld the ends of the strips together.

Step 5

Bolt the wooden slats you created in Step 1 onto the metal strips to form the basket.

Support Frame

Step 1

Form the square sides of the press with the 4-by-4-by-36-inch support beams and secure them to the 4-by-4-by-24-inch support beams with the carriage bolts, placing four onto each end.

Step 2

Add the 4-by-4-by-26-inch support beams to form the sides of the press and secure them into position with the 16-penny nails.

Step 3

Sand the frame to remove any rough edges with a 90-grit sandpaper.

Trough and Drain

Step 1

Form the trough by cutting the 5/8-by-1-3/4-by-90-inch piece of plywood to form a triangular end to better steer the cider. Add a rim to the trough by gluing extra plywood scraps onto the edges of the entire trough with waterproof wood glue.

Step 2

Cut 14 drain slats from the 5/8-by-15 1/2-by- 20-inch maple board measuring 5/8 by 1 by 15 1/2 inches. Cut an additional three slats measuring 5/8 by 1 by 14 3/4 inches.

Step 3

Lay the 14 drain slats on a flat surface and space them 1/16 inches apart.

Step 4

Set the three additional slats on top of the drain slats at right angles with the slats.

Step 5

Screw the slats together using the flat-head wood screws.

Screw and Press

Step 1

Thread the piano screw through the squeezer board and hold it in place with carriage bolts.

Step 2

Thread the other end of the screw through a mounted nut on the support frame.

Step 3

Weld a handle made of the metal strip and wooden dowel to the top of the screw.

Things You'll Need

  • Maple board, 5/8 by 12 by 40 inches
  • Jigsaw
  • Drill
  • 2 metal straps, 3/16 by 1 by 38 inches
  • 12-inch diameter bucket
  • Clamp
  • Spot welder
  • 64 3/16-inch flathead bolts 1 1/4 inches long, with lockwashers and nuts
  • 4 wood beams, 4 by 4 by 36 inches
  • 16 carriage bolts with flat washers, lockwashers and nuts, 5/16 by 4 inches
  • 2 wood beams, 4 by 4 by 24 inches
  • 4 wood beams, 2 by 4 by 26 inches
  • 24 16-penny common nails
  • 90-grit sandpaper
  • Exterior plywood, 1/2 by 15 1/2 by 36 inches
  • Exterior plywood, 5/8 1-3/4 by 90 inches
  • 18 1inch flat-head wood screws
  • Maple board, 5/8 by 15 1/2 by 20 inches
  • 42 1-inch flat-head wood screws
  • Piano stool screw
  • 3 1/2-inch piece of pipe
  • 2 carriage bolts with lockwashers and nuts, 5/16 by 5 inches
  • 3 carriage bolts with lockwashers and nuts, 1/2 by 2 inches
  • Hardwood board, 5/8 by 11 by 22 inches
  • Circular metal plate, 1/2 by 6 inches
  • Metal plate, 1/4 by 2 by 6 inches
  • Flat washer attachment, 2 1/2 inches
  • Piece of pipe, 1 1/2 inches
  • 5/16-by-5-inch machine bolt with 2 flat washers, lockwasher and 3 nuts
  • 1/2-by-1-by-8-inch metal strip
  • 1-by-4-inch wooden dowel
  • 1/2-by-1-inch machine bolt with lockwasher and nut

References

  • Mother Earth News: Cider Press
Keywords: make apple press, apple press design, apple press instructions

About this Author

Steven White is a privately contracted software engineer, web developer, and tech support representative. He has 3 years of experience providing technical support for AT&T broadband customers. He is currently a Master's of Software Engineering student and enjoys sharing his knowledge and expertise with others.