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How to Make a Berry Wreath

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How to Make a Berry Wreath

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Overview

A berry wreath can add a splash of color and light fragrance to a home and be used for holidays, special events or year round. Any type of berries can be used, such as those growing in the garden or the wild or purchased from a florist.

Step 1

Purchase a grapevine wreath approximately 9 to 12 inches in diameter. Use a circle or heart-shaped wreath. Lay the wreath on your work surface.

Step 2

Select berries for your wreath, using all one type of berry or a mixture of two or more. Choose berries such as china berries, French mulberry, pepper berry, nandina berries and even small crabapples, which resemble berries.

Step 3

Cut the berries with pruning shears and wear gardening gloves to protect your hands. Cut the stems or branches to about 3 to 5 inches long.

Step 4

Insert the berries into the grapevine wreath. Start with the larger berries, if using more than one type, and insert the berry stem into the wreath. Continue adding berries using floral wire to secure the berry stems to the wreath. Cover the wreath completely with berries.

Step 5

Add a few sprigs of eucalyptus leaves sparsely among the berries to add some contrasting color. Spray the wreath with acrylic spray to preserve it longer.

Things You'll Need

  • Grapevine wreath
  • Pruning shears
  • Garden gloves
  • Berries
  • Eucalyptus
  • Floral wire

References

  • Country Living: Berry Wreaths
  • Good Housekeeping: Holiday Wreaths
Keywords: making berry wreaths, berry wreath crafts, make berry wreath

About this Author

Amy Madtson resides in southern Oregon and has been writing for Demand Studios since 2008, focusing on health and gardening for websites such as eHow and GardenGuides. Madtson has an Associate of Arts in business from Peninsula College in Port Angeles, Washington. She holds a childbirth educator certification and a one-year midwifery completion certificate.