What Are the Seasons for Growing Wheat?

Wheat is the third largest U.S. field crop behind corn and soybeans. Internationally, the U.S. ranks fourth in production of wheat, behind China, the European Union and India. Some varieties of wheat are more useful for breads and flours; others species are better suited to noodles and pasta. The growing season of wheat depends on the type of wheat.

Hard Red Winter Wheat

Hard winter wheat, used mainly for bread flour, is largely grown in a belt, centered in Kansas, that runs from Texas to Montana and the Dakotas. It is planted from the beginning of September through the end of October and is harvested from mid to late August. Hard red winter wheat and other varieties of winter wheat account for 70 to 80 percent of the wheat grown in the United States.

Soft Red Winter Wheat

Soft red winter wheat, grown east of the Mississippi River, is used mainly for flour used to bake cookies, cakes and crackers. It is planted throughout September until the end of October and is harvested from the end of May through the end of July.

Soft White Winter Wheat

Soft white winter wheat, used for flour that is made into cereals, crackers and white-crusted breads, is grown mostly in southeastern Washington state and northeastern Oregon. It is planted from the first of September through the middle of November and harvested from the middle of July through August.

Hard Red Spring Wheat

Hard red spring wheat has high levels of protein; flour from this wheat is blended with flours that contain less protein. It is grown in Montana, Minnesota and North and South Dakota. It is planted from the middle of April through the end of May and is harvested from the middle of July through the middle of September.

Durham Wheat

Durham wheat, made into pasta, is grown in Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. Durham wheat is planted from the middle of April through the end of May and is harvested from the middle of July through the middle of September.

Keywords: wheat growing seasons, wheat planting harvest, wheat cultivation

About this Author

Richard Hoyt, the author of 26 mysteries, thrillers and other novels, is a former reporter for Honolulu dailies and writer for "Newsweek" magazine. He taught nonfiction writing and journalism at the university level for 10 years. He holds a Ph.D. in American studies.