• All
  • Articles
  • Videos
  • Plants
  • Recipes
  • Members

How to Compost With Eggshells

Comments ()  |   |  Text size: a A  |  Report Abuse  |  Print
close

Report This Article

How to Compost With Eggshells

Reason for flagging?

Comments

Submit

Share:    |  Email  |  Bookmark and Share

Overview

Composting turns kitchen scraps, paper and garden clippings into organic material for the garden. Make a do-it-yourself compost heap by using a frame of wooden posts surrounded by chicken wire fencing. Attach the wire fencing with twist ties. Composting works best when one-third of the material used is brown matter such as shredded paper or dry leaves; one-third green material such as lawn clippings; and one-third kitchen scraps such as eggshells. Eggshells add calcium to the compost.

Step 1

Place eggs shells in a plastic bag with a zip closure. Crush the eggshells by pressing on them with your hands while they are inside the bag. Place the bag in the freezer until you have several dozen to compost.

Step 2

Let the bag stand outside the freezer for 30 minutes to defrost.

Step 3

Sprinkle the shells evenly over the compost heap.

Step 4

Cover with a layer of brown matter, green matter, a handful of nitrogen-based fertilizer and a 1-inch layer of garden soil. Continue until the compost bin is full.

Step 5

Turn the materials with a shovel every few weeks.

Step 6

Spread the compost over the garden when it's brown and crumbly and you can't see chunks of the original material. This will usually take eight to 12 weeks.

Tips and Warnings

  • Eggshells attract critters to the compost heap, including rats, raccoons, snakes and dogs.

Things You'll Need

  • Eggshells
  • Zip closure bags
  • Compost heap
  • Brown matter, such as leaves
  • Green matter, such as grass clippings
  • Nitrogen fertilizer
  • Shovel

References

  • "The Country Garden"; Charlie Ryrie; 2003
Keywords: egg shells compost, eggshell composting, add eggs compost

About this Author

Katie Rosehill holds an MBA from Arizona State University. She began her writing career soon after college and has written website content and e-books. Her articles have appeared on GardenGuides.com, eHow, and GolfLinks. Favorite topics include personal finance - that MBA does come in handy sometimes - weddings and gardening.