How to Propagate Datura

Overview

Although datura has medicinal uses, it can be poisonous if ingested. If grown in your garden, it should be marked as such. It is inadvisable to plant datura in areas animals or children frequent. But when the proper precautions are taken, datura is quite easy to grow and propagate. It prefers slightly acidic soil, but will grow virtually anywhere. There are two types of datura: perennial and annual. Both can be propagated easily by seed. Angel trumpet datura, a perennial, can also be propagated by root cuttings.

Seed

Step 1

Collect the small, dark seeds that fall out of the ripe pods in mid or late summer.

Step 2

Remove any weeds (and their root systems) and debris from the planting area.

Step 3

Till the planting area with a hand tiller. Loosen and turn the soil to a depth of 8 inches. Remove any rocks or plant debris that you encounter.

Step 4

Plant the seeds directly into the garden, 3/4 inch deep and 1 foot apart.

Step 5

Water the soil with a gentle spray of water so the top few inches of the soil are moist. Continue to keep the soil moist to this depth until roughly two weeks after the seeds germinate.

Root Cuttings

Step 1

Remove any weeds (and their root systems) and debris from the planting area.Till the planting area with a hand tiller. Loosen and turn the soil to a depth of 8 inches. Remove any rocks or plant debris that you encounter.

Step 2

Use a trowel to unearth a section of datura's thick roots.

Step 3

Prune a 3- to 4-inch section of the thickest roots for each datura plant that you intend to grow. Do not prune more than one-third of a single datura plant's roots during any one season. Re-bury the parent plant's roots when you have finished pruning.

Step 4

Plant each root section 1 inch deep, cut-section up and 1 foot apart.

Step 5

Water the soil with a gentle spray of water so the top few inches of the soil are moist. Continue to keep the soil moist to this depth until roughly two weeks after the root cuttings germinate.

Things You'll Need

  • Hand tiller
  • Trowel
  • Pruning shears

References

  • Medicinal Plants of the Southwest: Datura stramonium
  • New Mexico State University: Propagating Datura and Trumpet Vine
Keywords: datura, propagate, seed, root cutting

About this Author

Emma Gin is a freelance writer who specializes in green, healthy and smart living. She is currently working on developing a weight-loss website that focuses on community and re-education. Gin is also working on a collection of short stories, because she knows what they say about idle hands.