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How to Treat Barley Seed

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How to Treat Barley Seed

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Overview

Barley seed is susceptible to a number of fungal diseases. These fungi may persist on the surface of the seed or inhabit the embryo in its interior. There are a number of broad-spectrum systemic fungicides that kill fungal diseases of barley seed. To treat these seeds, the fumigant manufacturers recommend using a seed treater. Seed treaters tumble the seed and the fungicide to allow even and effective coverage. They also limit your contact with the potentially harmful fungicide.

Step 1

Add the barley seed to the seed treater.

Step 2

Add the fungicide. The systemic fungicides triadimenol (Baytan) and tebuconazole (Raxil) control loose smut, semi-loose smut, root rot and take-all disease. Insert these fungicides into the seed treater according to the seed treater's operating instructions. Read the fungicide's label carefully. Apply Baytan at a rate of 50ml per 100kg of seed (100ml per 100kg to treat take-all). Apply Raxil at a rate of 22ml per 100kg.

Step 3

Agitate the seed and fungicide in the seed treater for the amount of time dictated by the seed treater's instruction manual.

Step 4

Remove the treated seed from the machine if your seed treater does not have a planting function. Plant the seed immediately or read the fungicide's label to determine how long you can store the seed after it has been treated.

Tips and Warnings

  • Do not use treated barley seed for consumption or oil processing. Do not feed livestock with the barley until four weeks after it is planted.

Things You'll Need

  • Seed treater
  • Fungicide

References

  • North Dakota State University: Seed Treatment for Disease Control
  • Pest Management Regulatory Agency: Baytan 30 Flowable Fungicide
  • Hyland Seeds: Raxil
Keywords: using seed treater, barley seed fungicide, treating barley seed

About this Author

Emma Gin is a freelance writer who specializes in green, healthy and smart living. She is currently working on developing a weight-loss website that focuses on community and re-education. Gin is also working on a collection of short stories, because she knows what they say about idle hands.