How to Build Squirrel Feeders

Overview

Entertaining outdoor wildlife can be as simple as hanging a bird feeder, or as complex as building a bat box. One type of wildlife that can bring hours of interest for a home owner is the squirrel. You can build squirrel feeders for hardly any cost and begin enjoying watching squirrels come right to your deck or patio to eat dried corncobs.

Step 1

Stand your 13-inch board up on one end. Lie the 10-inch board down and butt the end of the 10-inch board against the side of the 13-inch board to form an L shape.

Step 2

Screw two galvanized screws spaced 2 inches apart through the bottom of the 13-inch board and into the end of the 10-inch board to secure the two together.

Step 3

Turn the unit over onto one side. Along the bottom of the 10-inch board find the center of the board. Screw a 4-inch screw all the way through the center of the board to leave 3 inches of screw sticking up in the center of the 10-inch board.

Step 4

Attach the unit to a wall or deck railing along the back or bottom of the L using four screws at each corner of the appropriate board as needed for the location you are nailing to. Lightly pull and push on the squirrel feeder to make sure it is secure.

Step 5

Spear a dried corncob onto the 3 inches of screw and leave the feeder unit alone. Check back to see that squirrels have come to investigate. Once a cob is stripped of its kernels, replace it with a new corncob to keep squirrels coming.

Things You'll Need

  • 1 1-by-4-inch board, 13 inches long
  • 1 1-by-4-inch board, 10 inches long
  • 6 galvanized screws, 2 inches long
  • Drill
  • 4-inch screw
  • Squirrel-feed dried corncobs

References

  • “How to Make a Wildlife Garden”; Chris Baines; 2000
  • “National Wildlife Federation Attracting Birds, Butterflies & Backyard Wildlife”; David Mizejewski; 2003
Keywords: making squirrel feeders, homemade squirrel feeders, building squirrel feeders

About this Author

Margaret Telsch-Williams is a freelance, fiction, and poetry writer from the Blue Ridge mountains. When not writing articles for Demand Studios, she works for WidescreenWarrior.com as a contributor and podcast co-host.