How to Have A Venus Fly Trap Indoors

Overview

The Dionaea muscipula is a small perennial plant that grows in wet coastal plains of the Carolinas, within a radius of 60 to 75 miles around Wilmington, N.C., according to the Florida Department of Agriculture. The flytrap has a trap mechanism consisting of two halves that contain stiff hairs along the edge. When the stiff hairs are triggered by the movement of a fly, they spring together. This unique characteristic makes the Venus flytrap a popular indoor plant.

Step 1

Place 1 inch of gravel at the bottom of the fish tank.

Step 2

Place a 3- to 4-inch layer of two parts sphagnum peat moss and one part coarse sand over the gravel to aid in drainage.

Step 3

Transplant the Venus flytrap into the soil at the same depth as it was in the previous container or tray.

Step 4

Water the growing medium so that it is moist to the touch but not dripping wet. Never leave standing puddles. Place a piece of acrylic glass on top of the fish tank to hold in moisture and humidity.

Step 5

Place the fish tank near a south- or west-facing window to give the Venus flytrap adequate sunlight. Keep the plant at 70 to 75 degrees Fahrenheit during the summer and 55 to 60 Fahrenheit during the winter for best results.

Step 6

Fertilize the flytrap once a month during the summer using a light fish emulsion fertilizer, if the plant looks weak. Follow the label instructions.

Things You'll Need

  • Venus flytrap Fish tank Acrylic glass Peat moss Coarse sand Window Fish emulsion fertilizer

References

  • Iowa State University Extension: How Does One Care for a Venus Flytrap
  • Texas A&M : Venus Fly Trap
  • Florida Department of Agriculture: Venus Flytrap, Dionaea Muscipula, A Plant Which Eats Insects
Keywords: Venus fly trap, Fly trap care, Indoor venus flytrap

About this Author

Cleveland Van Cecil is a freelancer writer specializing in technology. He has been a freelance writer for three years and has published extensively on eHow.com, writing articles on subjects as diverse as boat motors and hydroponic gardening. Van Cecil has a Bachelor of Arts in liberal arts from Baldwin-Wallace College.