How to Make a Terrarium for a Venus Flytrap

Overview

When you get a Venus flytrap, chances are it came in a small pot with a plastic domed cover, as Venus flytraps prefer a hot, humid environment. If you do not have a terrarium at home to transplant the flytrap to, you can easily make one with common household items.

Repot the Venus Flytrap

Step 1

Mix together equal amounts of peat or sphagnum moss and sand in a large bowl or bucket.

Step 2

Fill the bottom 1 inch of a 6-inch pot with pebbles and the next 1/4 inch with activated charcoal.

Step 3

Fill the remaining pot with the moss mixture. Dig a hole 2 inches deep and 2 inches wide in the center of the mixture. Water the mixture until water drains from the bottom of the pot.

Step 4

Remove the Venus flytrap from the original pot. Shake any soil mixture gently from the roots.

Step 5

Place the root ball of the Venus flytrap into the center of the dug hole and cover with additional moss and sand medium.

Make the Terrarium

Step 1

Wash and rinse a 2-liter soda bottle. Remove the label and put the cap back on.

Step 2

Cut the bottom one-third of the plastic bottle off using scissors or a razor knife.

Step 3

Set the open end of the bottom over the Venus flytrap in the pot.

Step 4

Press down on the top of the bottle to ensure that it is firmly in the pot.

Step 5

Remove the cap of the bottle when water condensation begins appearing on the inside. This will allow fresh air into the terrarium.

Things You'll Need

  • Peat or sphagnum moss Sand Large bowl or bucket Pebbles Activated charcoal 6-inch growing container Garden trowel or large spoon 2-liter soda bottle Scissors or razor knife

References

  • University of Georgia: Make a Soda Bottle Terrarium (PDF)
  • Oklahoma State University Extension: Terrariums (PDF)
  • University of Missouri Extension: Terrariums
Keywords: flytrap terrarium, homemade terrarium, soda bottle terrarium

About this Author

G. K. Bayne is a freelance writer, currently writing for Demand Studios where her expertise in back-to-basics, computers and electrical equipment are the basis of her body of work. Bayne began her writing career in 1975 and has written for Demand since 2007.