How to Buy Jasmine Flowers

Overview

Jasmine (Jasminum), a member of the olive family, is a flowering shrub loved by gardeners in warm climates for its prolific, fragrant blooms. The plant is hardy from zones 7 to 10, although winter jasmine (J. nudiflorum) is hardy to zone 6. The plant has a twining habit, although it is not self-supporting and must be secured to a trellis or stake. In warm climates, it grows to a length of 30 feet. In temperate zones, grow jasmine as an annual or pot it up and bring it inside before the first frost.

Step 1

Select a jasmine variety, based on your climate and site location. Common white jasmine (J. officinale) is very fragrant, hardy to zone 7 and grows to 30 feet. This variety is a good choice if you live in a warm area where the jasmine can grow outside year-round. In temperate climates, try winter jasmine or pink jasmine (J. polyanthum). These varieties are smaller and grow well as houseplants.

Step 2

Buy jasmine at reputable nurseries, greenhouses or online gardening stores. Select plants with healthy, strong stems and green leaves, preferably with a few flowers so you know exactly what you're getting.

Step 3

Plant jasmine outside after the last expected frost in moist, well-drained, loamy soil. Plant jasmine inside in a pot at least 12 inches in diameter. Use sterile potting mix and water every two or three days to keep the soil evenly moist. Place the plant in a sunny window.

Things You'll Need

  • Potting soil
  • Pot (at least 12 inches diameter)
  • Shovel

References

  • "The Garden Primer"; Barbara Damrosch; 1988
  • Clemson University Extension Office: Jasmine

Who Can Help

  • University of Georgia Cooperative Extension: Growing Indoor Plants With Success
Keywords: buying jasmine, growing jasmine flowers, planting jasmine flowers

About this Author

Julie Christensen has been writing for five years. Her work has appeared in "The Friend" and "Western New York Parent" magazines. Her guide for teachers, "Helping Young Children Cope with Grief" will be published this spring. Christensen studied early childhood education at Ricks College and recently returned to school to complete a degree in communications/English.