• All
  • Articles
  • Videos
  • Plants
  • Recipes
  • Members

How To Trim A Knock Out Rose Tree

Comments ()  |   |  Text size: a A  |  Report Abuse  |  Print
close

Report This Article

How To Trim A Knock Out Rose Tree

Reason for flagging?

Comments

Submit

Share:    |  Email  |  Bookmark and Share

Overview

Knock Out roses are a new variety that make rose gardening a breeze. Whether you choose a Knock Out rose tree or bush, this plant offers prolific blooms with little maintenance. The roses are resistant to disease, including black spot, thrive in most soils and are even drought-tolerant. These roses even self-clean---they require no dead-heading because spent flowers drop and new ones emerge. Knock Out rose trees are hardier than most rose trees, although they do benefit from winter protection.

Step 1

Cut out diseased and dead wood with your pruners from early spring to fall. Discard all branches promptly to avoid introducing diseases, especially if you have other rose varieties in your garden. While Knock Out rose trees are disease-resistant, good hygiene practices will ensure healthy plants.

Step 2

Rip out suckers by grasping them between your fingers and pulling. Suckers are spindly, vegatative growths that sprout from main limbs. Pruning them will cause them to re-grow.

Step 3

Prune back the tips of your rose tree throughout the growing season to maintain its shape. Rose trees don't require severe pruning, but if you want to reshape the tree, prune in early spring when buds swell, but new growth hasn't begun. Make cuts 1/4 inch above an outward-facing bud. Cut at a 45-degree angle so water will run off the cut.

Things You'll Need

  • Hand pruning shears

References

  • Rose Gardening 101: Pruning Knock Out Roses
  • University of Illinois Extension: Pruning

Who Can Help

  • University of Ilinois Extension: Selecting Rose Plants
Keywords: knock out roses, pruning rose trees, growing rose trees

About this Author

Julie Christensen has been writing for five years. Her work has appeared in "The Friend" and "Western New York Parent" magazines. Her guide for teachers, "Helping Young Children Cope with Grief" will be published this spring. Christensen studied early childhood education at Ricks College and recently returned to school to complete a degree in communications/English.

Member Calendar Entries