How to Make a Carnation Flower Lei

Overview

Make carnation flower leis at pre-party gatherings to get the group in a party mood. The carnation is not a native Hawaiian flower, but you can use it--and any other medium-sized flower--to make beautiful leis. Once finished, store the leis in the refrigerator for up to five days. For best results, make the leis the morning of the party or the night before.

Step 1

Harvest your carnation flowers early in the morning while they still contain all of their stored energy. Early-morning harvested carnations last longer.

Step 2

Cut a 7 foot 8 inch length of strong polyester thread. Then thread it through a lei needle until it is doubled. Tie a knot at the end of the thread.

Step 3

Clip a clothespin onto the doubled string, 3 inches above the knot. This will prevent you from pushing the flowers down too low to tie a knot.

Step 4

Prune the stem off of each carnation, right below the point where it joins the blossom.

Step 5

Thread your needle through the center of the carnation's petals and out through the middle of the wound where the stem used to be. Carefully (do not force it) slide the carnation down to the clothespin.

Step 6

Repeat Step 5 for all 50 flowers. Nestle the stem wound of each subsequent carnation into the center of the previous carnation's petals. Stop when you are 3 inches away from the lei needle.

Step 7

Cut the thread off at the base of the needle.

Step 8

Tie the ends of the thread together with a knot so that it looks like one continuous line of flowers. Cut off the excess thread.

Things You'll Need

  • 50 carnations
  • Strong polyester thread
  • Pruning shears
  • 6- or 12-inch Lei needle
  • Measuring tape
  • Clothespin

References

  • Blooms of Hawaii: How to Make an Orchid Lei
  • Hawaii Flower Lei: How to Make a Lei
Keywords: carnation leis, make party leis, DIY leis

About this Author

Emma Gin is a freelance writer who specializes in green, healthy and smart living. She is currently working on developing a weight-loss website that focuses on community and re-education. Gin is also working on a collection of short stories, because she knows what they say about idle hands.