How to Plant Bamboo in Soil

Overview

There are over 1,000 species of bamboo, the largest grass and the fastest growing woody plant in the world. Bamboo is grouped into two categories: clumping and running. Clumping bamboo is slow to spread and grows in a clump. Running bamboo tends to be invasive, with roots that can spread over 100 feet from the plant. To avoid the takeover of other parts of the landscape, a physical barrier needs to be implanted into the soil, to a depth of 3 feet. Because of this, running types of bamboo are rarely planted in the residential landscape.

Step 1

Choose a planting location for your bamboo. Large bamboos need at least five hours of sunlight per day. The Fargesias need partial shade while varieties such as Moso need full sun all day.

Step 2

Add a 3-inch layer of sphagnum peat moss and a 2-inch layer of compost to the planting area and use the shovel or gardening fork to mix the material into the top 6 inches of soil.

Step 3

Measure the nursery pot in which the bamboo is growing and dig the planting hole the same depth and twice as wide. Place the bamboo plant's roots into the hole and fill the hole with soil. Space bamboo plants 3 to 5 feet apart.

Step 4

Pour 4 inches of mulch on the soil around the bamboo. Spread the mulch out in a 1-foot radius around the plant.

Step 5

Saturate the soil around the bamboo plant with water and give it one gallon of water once a week.

Tips and Warnings

  • Bamboo in one or two gallon pots should be planted in the spring or fall to give them a head start before extremes in weather occur.

Things You'll Need

  • Sphagnum peat moss
  • Compost
  • Shovel or gardening fork
  • Measuring tape
  • Mulch

References

  • Maryland Cooperative Extension: Bamboo
  • Palomar Community College: Bamboo: Remarkable Giant Grasses
  • ‭"‬California Master Gardener Handbook"; Dennis R. Pittenger; 2002
Keywords: plant bamboo soil, planting bamboo, growing bamboo

About this Author

Victoria Hunter has been a freelance writer since 2005, specializing in gardening-related topics and the real estate industry. She is a former broadcaster and real estate agent who has provided audio and written services to small businesses and large corporations worldwide. She writes for Ancestry.com, GardenGuides and ProFlowers, among others. Hunter holds a Bachelor of Arts in English/creative writing.