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How to Construct Garden Edging With Timber

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How to Construct Garden Edging With Timber

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Overview

Few gardens in a landscape look complete without some form of edging. Edging helps keep weeds out of a bed and mulch in place. One popular form of edging used in many gardens is landscaping timber. Landscaping timbers are made of specially treated wood so that they will be resistant to weathering and rot when placed on the soil around a garden. When selecting landscaping timber, you should not use pressure-treated timber. Chemically treated timbers may release chemicals into the soil that can harm your garden plants.

Step 1

Measure out the diameter of your garden bed and drive wooden stakes into the corners. Tie string between the stakes to guide you as you build the bed.

Step 2

Dig trenches for your landscaping timbers that are at least 4 inches deep. This depth will help to prevent grass runners from growing beneath the edging and into the garden.

Step 3

Cut landscaping timbers to the correct size.

Step 4

Drill holes into each timber to create a channel for rebar stakes.

Step 5

Lay a row of landscaping timbers around the perimeter of the garden bed. Drive the rebar stakes through the predrilled holes and into the ground.

Things You'll Need

  • Tape measure
  • Wooden stakes
  • Hammer
  • String
  • Shovel
  • Spade
  • ½-inch-diameter rebar stakes
  • Drill
  • ½-inch drill bit
  • Landscaping timbers
  • Circular saw

References

  • University of Wyoming Cooperative Extension Service: Landscape edging a great addition to yards
  • Texas A&M University Extension: Building a Raised Bed Garden

Who Can Help

  • University of Missouri Extension: Raised Bed Gardening
Keywords: Landscaping with timber, Creating garden borders, Edging a garden

About this Author

Tracy S. Morris has been a freelance writer since 2000. She has published two novels and numerous online articles. Her work has appeared in national magazines and newspapers, including "Ferrets," "CatFancy," "Lexington Herald Leader" and "The Tulsa World."