How to Plant Strawberries and Spacing

Overview

Spacing of strawberries and whether you remove runners, the plants produced from the original plant, depends on the type of planting system you choose to grow your strawberries in: matted row, spaced-row or hill systems. Which system you choose depends on how much work you plan to do and how many strawberries you hope to harvest.

Step 1

Plant strawberry plants in the spring as soon as you can work the ground easily, usually in March or April. Wait until a cloudy day or late afternoon to plant.

Step 2

Dig small, shallow holes with a garden trowel. Plant strawberry plants so that the soil just covers the root tops. Keep the crown uncovered to allow runner production.

Step 3

Space strawberry plants 18 to 30 inches apart with rows 3 feet apart when using the matted row system. Allow runners to root without constraint. This system produces average yields with no maintenance.

Step 4

Space strawberry plants 18 to 30 inches with 3 feet between rows when using the spaced-row system. While the initial spacing follows the matted row system, it differs in that you pull all runners that root within 4 inches of the original plant. This system produces high yields with a little bit of maintenance.

Step 5

Space strawberry plants 1 foot apart with 2 feet between rows when using the hill system. Remove all runners as they appear, leaving only the original plant. These plants produce well, but produce less each year; replace plants every one to three years.

Things You'll Need

  • Garden trowel

References

  • University of Illinois Extension: Growing Strawberries
  • University of Minnesota Extension: Strawberries for the Home Garden
Keywords: plant strawberries, strawberry spacing, planting strawberries, growing strawberries

About this Author

Sommer Sharon has a bachelor's degree in IT/Web management from the University of Phoenix and owns a Web consulting business. With more than 12 years of experience in the publishing industry, her work has included "Better Homes and Gardens," "Ladies' Home Journal," "MORE," "Country Home," "Midwest Living," and "American Baby." Sharon now contributes her editorial background by writing for several Internet publications.