Lawn Border Design Ideas

Whether a border is required around a tree, driveway or pathway through the landscape, gardeners have a variety of choices in items they can use in their border design. Choices include everything from plants to organic and inorganic items that will spruce up the bordered area. Gardeners can make their border very simplistic to make it an eye-catching feature of their lawn and landscape.

Stones

Gardeners desiring a basic border that is relatively simplistic can use stones. There are various choices in stone materials such as lava rock, pea gravel, coquina rock and regular stones that come in a variety of sizes and colors to match your landscape. These products are inorganic and will not benefit the soil, but they are relatively easy to install and maintain and will not require frequent replacement. When working with stones, it is best to first level the soil and lay down a piece of ground cloth or weed barrier cloth before installing the stones. This will keep the stones from seeping down into the soil. Gardeners can hand pull weeds or use an herbicide.

Mulch

Using mulch as a groundcover in your bordered area is another simple and relatively inexpensive design. Mulch is an organic material that will also help build up the soil as it decomposes. Mulch varieties come in various forms from cypress to pine bark, and colors vary from dark brown, regular brown and tan to red, so gardeners can choose a variety complementing their landscape. It is also easy to edge around. Mulch is relatively easy to install, with only the need to level the area's soil and remove any weeds before the application. Gardeners will most likely need to apply a fresh application of mulch every season to keep the area fresh looking.

Ornamental Grasses

Quite a few native and ornamental grasses are well suited for growing in bordered areas. Usually these grasses are hardy and require little or no maintenance to keep them looking their best, and many are perennial evergreens. Border grass or Liriope (Liriope muscari), though it really belongs in the lily family, makes a handsome and hardy addition to bordered areas. Its tolerance to sun and shady conditions makes it well suited for all types of borders. Check the area where you live within the United States to find an ornamental grass well suited for your particular part of the country. Lining the soil area after planting with stones or mulch will give the border an even more attractive look.

Perennials and Annuals

Gardeners can fill the border with either annuals or perennials or mix the two together for year-round color. Using taller perennials planted on the inside of the border and lining the outside with flowering annuals makes for an eye-catching feature. As the annuals go out of season and quit blooming, gardeners can change them out with fresh flowers that are just starting their blooming season. When mixing any two species of plants together in the same planting area, be sure the plants have the same requirements in water and sun so problems do not arise.

Keywords: border area designs, planting a border, lawn border ideas

About this Author

Joyce Starr is a freelance writer from Florida and owns a landscaping company and garden center. She has published articles about camping in Florida, lawncare, gardening and writes for a local gardening newsletter. She shares her love and knowledge of the outdoors and nature through her writing.