Propagating Chinese Mulberry Trees

Overview

The Chinese mulberry (Cudrania tricuspidata), also known as che, is native to Asia. Depending on how it is trained when young, Chinese mulberry can grow as a deciduous tree (to 25 feet tall) or a large bush. The plant's fruit is described as a cross between a mulberry and a lychee, according to the California Rare Fruit Growers. Chinese mulberry seed does not store well. so it generally is propagated from softwood cuttings taken in mid-summer. ‭

Step 1

‭Determine if the stems are at the appropriate stage for cutting. Bend a stem to see if it snaps, which would indicate softwood and is suitable for propagation. ‭

Step 2

Cut a 6-inch piece of the stem 1 inch below a leaf node. Place it on top of a moist paper towel in a plastic bag. Seal the bag and keep it out of the direct sun.

Step 3

‭Fill a planting pot with moist sand. Poke a planting hole into the soil with a finger. Place craft sticks into the soil next to the rim of the pot, one each at the top, bottom and either side. ‭

Step 4

Remove the cutting's lower leaves. Dip the bottom of the cutting into rooting hormone. Tap the cutting on the side of the container to remove excess hormone.

Step 5

‭Stick the cutting into the prepared soil and pack the sand around it. Spray the cutting with water from a misting bottle. ‭

Step 6

Place the pot in the plastic bag. Adjust the bag over the craft sticks so that the plastic is not touching the cutting. Place the pot in a well-lit area, out of direct sunlight. Spray the soil periodically with water to maintain consistent moisture. The cutting should root within four weeks.

Things You'll Need

  • Pruning shears
  • ‭Planting pot
  • ‭Coarse sand
  • ‭Rooting hormone
  • ‭Craft sticks
  • ‭Transparent plastic bag
  • ‭Plant misting bottle

References

  • ‭California Rare Fruit Growers: Che ‭
  • ‭Fine Gardening: Propagate Your Shrub From Softwood Cuttings
  • "Physiology of Temperate Zone Fruit Trees"; Miklos Faust; 1989
Keywords: Chinese mulberry cuttings, propagate Chinese mulberry, grow Chinese mulberry

About this Author

Victoria Hunter has been a freelance writer since 2005, specializing in gardening-related topics and the real estate industry. She is a former broadcaster and real estate agent who has provided audio and written services to small businesses and large corporations worldwide. She writes for Ancestry.com, GardenGuides and ProFlowers, among others. Hunter holds a Bachelor of Arts in English/creative writing.