How to Scallop Edge a Lawn

Overview

When people mention scallop edging in their garden, a lot of people think of painted concrete blocks or small wire fences with a scalloped top. But, before this type of scallop edging became common, many gardeners decorated the edges of their lawns and gardens with small natural fences called wattles. These simple, short fences are highly ornamental and they are simple to install and build. Because you are shaping the fence yourself, you can make the scallops as tall as you like.

Step 1

Collect a few bundles of very flexible suckers (green sapling wood) and thin branches. You will also need a group of 24-inch sturdy uprights. Sharpen one end of each of your uprights using a gardening knife or axe. You will space your uprights every 10 to 12 inches, so have enough for the length of your lawn.

Step 2

Drive a piece of rebar 12 inches into the ground. Measure every 10 to 12 inches and make another hole. Insert one of the upright sticks in each hole and hammer it in tightly.

Step 3

Take a piece of flexible sapling and weave it in and out between the uprights. Form the size and height of scallop that you want to use. Each 5-post upright section is called a hurdle. You can have more than one scallop top per hurdle. Use hemp string to tie the ends of the scallops to the uprights if you are making smaller scallops.

Step 4

Weave additional sapling branches from the scallop top to the ground. Use gardening nips to trim the tops of the uprights to fit the scallop shape.

Things You'll Need

  • Suckers/sapling wood
  • Branches
  • Garden knife
  • Garden axe
  • Rebar
  • Hammer
  • Nippers
  • Hemp string

References

  • Mother Earth News: Making Simple Garden Fences And Trellises
  • "Making Bentwood Trellises, Arbors, Gates and Fences"; James Long; 1998
Keywords: wattle scallop edging, making wattle edging, edging lawn scallops

About this Author

F.R.R. Mallory is a senior at UC Berkeley completing degrees in both Neuropsychology and English. She has been published since 1996 in both nonfiction and fiction, books, short stories, articles and essays. Her fiction short story "Black Ice" recently won a National Space Society contest.