How to Grow Urban Vegetables

Overview

The ability to grow your own vegetables is no longer exclusive those who enjoy the country life. Many communities around the country have converted empty lots into community urban gardens, but if your area doesn't have one, growing vegetables at home is not so difficult even if you live in an urban apartment high-rise. Most vegetables have no problem growing indoors or on a balcony or patio.

Step 1

Choose vegetables your family likes to eat. Tomatoes, peppers, leeks, eggplant, onions, bush beans and peas are all easy to grow either in a small garden plot in the yard or in containers. Purchase transplants where possible from your garden center. Beans and peas are planted directly in the ground or container.

Step 2

Clear space on your balcony or patio for the containers your garden will need. If you do not have an outdoor area, clear space in front of a south- or west-facing window.

Step 3

Start bush beans and pea seeds by planting two to three seeds in each container filled with potting soil. Bury the seed approximately 1 inch into the soil and water the soil until it drains from the bottom. Follow the package instructions for spacing for vegetables such as lettuce, leeks or spinach.

Step 4

Transplant any seedlings to a larger pot. Fill the pot with potting soil, dig a hole in the soil using the garden trowel just slightly larger than the root ball of the transplant. Cover the root of the plant with additional soil. Water until the soil is moist to the touch.

Step 5

Move the container in front of the window if it is still cool outside and you haven't reached your last frost date for your area. If the weather is warm, you can move the containers directly outdoors if you have the space.

Step 6

Water your plants as often as necessary to keep the soil moist to the touch. Indoor plants may need to be watered every day or two.

Step 7

Harvest your vegetables as they ripen or reach the desired size.

Things You'll Need

  • Vegetable seeds and transplants
  • Growing containers
  • Potting soil
  • Garden spade

References

  • University of Illinois Extension: Vegetable Gardening Basics
  • Clemson University Extension: Container Vegetable Gardening

Who Can Help

  • University of Arizona Extension: Container Size Chart
Keywords: urban garden, grow indoor garden, container garden

About this Author

G. K. Bayne is a freelance writer, currently writing for Demand Studios where her expertise in back-to-basics, computers and electrical equipment are the basis of her body of work. Bayne began her writing career in 1975 and has written for Demand since 2007.