Ivy Geranium Varieties

Ivy geraniums (Pelargonium peltatum) are trailing plants that feature large clusters of bright, attractive flowers. They are often used in hanging baskets, window boxes and other containers. Like their more popular cousins, the zonal geraniums, ivy geraniums grow best in moist, fertile soil and plenty of sunlight. More than 75 cultivars of ivy geraniums are sold commercially, according to Iowa State University, and they vary widely in size, shape and color.

"Balcon"

"Balcon" ivy geraniums need cooler temperatures than most other types of geraniums. They prefer moderate heat--between 75 and no more than 85 degrees Fahrenheit--and afternoon shade. "Balcon" blooms in mid-to-late summer and has flowers on the small side, but they are also prolific bloomers. These ivy geraniums do not require deadheading (the removal of spent blooms) to continue to bloom, making "Balcon" a terrific choice for busy home gardeners.

"White Mesh"

"White Mesh" is a distinctive ivy geranium with leaves that feature creamy white veins when the weather is cool. In hot weather, the veins disappear. This leaf variegation is caused by a virus that does not otherwise harm the plant. The flowers range in color from pink to red to white. This ivy geranium blooms in mid-summer and needs deadheading to encourage reblooming.

"Summer Showers"

"Summer Showers" has a distinctive growth habit where the stems branch from the base. This means that you do not have to pinch off new growth to get the plant to grow into a fuller, bushier form. "Summer Showers" comes in many different colors, including deep red and pale pink. This variety is also desirable for the fact that it can be easily grown from seed, making it both an attractive and economical choice.

"Contessa"

"Contessa" is known for its capability to bloom in all types of summer weather, from cool and rainy to hot and dry. "Contessa" will bloom from early summer to early fall and comes in many colors.

Keywords: ivy geranium varieties, types of geranium, Pelargonium peltatum cultivars

About this Author

April Sanders has been a professional writer since 1998. Previously, she worked as an educator and currently writes academic research content for EBSCO publishing and elementary reading curriculum for Compass Publishing. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in social psychology from the University of Washington and a master's degree in information sciences and technology in education from Mansfield University.