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How to Eat Aloe Plants

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How to Eat Aloe Plants

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Overview

If you have an aloe vera plant growing in your yard or garden, you can easily cultivate it for medicinal purposes. Many people are aware that the plant's gel can sooth sunburns on skin, but the gel can also be ingested. You can eat aloe vera to receive a daily dose of vitamins, including vitamins A, C, E, niacin and folic acid. In order to eat the gel within the plant's leaves you must properly remove the gel.

Step 1

Use a sharp knife to cut off a leaf from your aloe vera plant. Wipe off the piece of the leaf with a paper towel to remove any dust.

Step 2

Cut off a small portion from the end of the leaf, and a yellow liquid begins to ooze out of the leaf.

Step 3

Lay the leaf on its side in a large bowl and slice the leaf in half. Open up the two halves in the bowl and you will see a light green gel inside the leaves.

Step 4

Use a spoon to gently scrape the green gel off of the leaves. Use your knife to cut the aloe gel into small portions once you have removed all of it from the leaves. Ingest no more than 2 tbsp. a day.

Step 5

Place the portions of the aloe gel into a small cup, and you can ingest the gel. The gel has no taste and should basically be taken as a daily dose of vitamins and minerals.

Things You'll Need

  • Aloe vera plant
  • Knife
  • Paper towel
  • Bowl
  • Spoon
  • Small cup

References

  • Aloe Vera and Handy Herbs: How to Eat Your Aloe Vera
  • Aloe Vera Juice Cosmetics: Top 10 Reasons to Drink Aloe Vera Juice
  • Radiant Health: Aloe Vera
Keywords: aloe vera plant, eat aloe gel, aloe vera vitamins

About this Author

Greg Lindberg is a graduate of Purdue University with a Bachelor of Liberal Arts degree in creative writing. His professional writing experience includes three years of technical writing for an agriculture IT department and a major pharmaceutical company, as well as four years as staff writer for a music and film webzine.