Flowers for Kids to Plant

To encourage small children who are interested in gardening, allow them to have a small space of their own in the flower bed. Providing them with simple seeds and easy flowers to grow will help them learn the basics of gardening. Purchase your children their own gardening gloves and some small tools so that they can get involved, and get their hands dirty too.

Sunflowers

Sunflowers are large bright colorful flowers that take up a lot of room. Allow the child to plant just one or two of these seeds. The seed begins to sprout within a week and then develops into a seedling by the second week. Within a month's time, the flower will be about 2 inches tall. For added fun and a snack later on, grow the type of sunflower that will produce edible kernels (confectionery). After two months of growing, the sunflower will make many seed-like kernels that will dry out later in the summer. Once the seed kernels have dried out, they may be picked and roasted for a snack. Save a few to plant more flowers for the next summer season.

Nasturtiums

Nasturtiums are perfect for a small child's impatient excitement because of their quick growth schedule. The flowers will bloom within fifty days after its seed has been planted. Nasturtiums have bright colors of orange, yellow and red. Shorter species are ideal for small flower gardens. Another great quality of the nasturtium is that it is resistant to pests, which makes it for simple to grow for children. For curious little tasters, this type of flower will not hurt children, because it is edible.

Marigolds

Marigolds involve little care and are easy to plant. The main task for taking care of marigolds is watering the soil around it when it is dry. Once the flowers have "died," children can have fun deadheading the blooms and collecting the seeds for next year's planting. Marigolds have a strong fragrance and come in bright colors, such as yellow and orange.

Keywords: flowers for children, children garden basics, planting with children, childrens first garden, gardening for children

About this Author

Ariana Cherry-Shearer, a poet and freelance writer, began writing for the Web in 2006. She is a certified computer applications specialist (earned at Lakeland Community College). Cherry-Shearer also writes for several online content websites and a weekly blog. Topics include travel, the Internet and crafts. She has also published collections of poetry.