Perennial Flowers That Spread

Flowers that spread out farther than they reach in height have a home in many places in a landscaping plan. Plant perennial flowers that spread and like full sun at the top of a stone wall and let the flowers spread down the sides. Plant flowers that like shade under a tall tree or plant a group in areas where it is hard to grow grass. Flowers that spread solve a multitude of gardening problems.

Creeping Myrtle

Creeping myrtle (Vinca minor) is also known as myrtle, periwinkle or vinca. The plant is a perennial evergreen that grows up to 6 inches tall and spreads out to about 3 feet in diameter. Plant in partial or full shade and a rich, moist, well-drained soil. Creeping myrtle will not do well in a full sun, six hours or more of sun a day, situation. The plant produces dark-green elliptic shaped leaves and blue-purple, red-lavender or white flowers that bloom from late March throughout the growing season. The plant is hardy in USDA Hardiness Zones 3 to 8.

Creeping Mahonia

Creeping mahonia (Mahonia repens) is hardy in USDA Hardiness Zones 5 to 8. The plant is a broadleaf evergreen that grows up to 1 foot tall and 1-1/2 feet wide. Yellow flowers bloom in April and are followed by clusters of edible, grape-like fruits. Compound, holly-like leaves are made up of three to seven blue-green leaflets that turn purple in the winter. Plant creeping mahonia in full sun or partial shade and a soil that is moist, rich and well drained.

Common Bearberry

Common bearberry (Arctostaphylos uva-ursi Massachusetts) grows up to 1 foot tall and from 3 to 6 feet wide. Small, dark-green leaves turn red-brown in winter. White flowers have pink accents, grow in hanging clusters, bloom in April and May and are followed by inedible, bright-red fruits. Plant common bearberry in full sun or partial shade and a soil that is poor, sandy, moist and well-drained soils that do not contain any fertilizer. The plant is hardy in USDA Hardiness Zones 2 to 6.

Orange Stonecrop

Orange stonecrop (Sedum kamtschaticum var. ellacombeanum) is hardy in USDA Hardiness Zones 3 to 8. The plant grows up to 6 inches tall and spreads out to about 1-1/2 feet wide featuring succulent-like, lime-green, triangle-shaped leaves with scalloped edges that grow about 4 inches high. Yellow-green, star-shaped flowers measure 1/2-inch wide, grow 2 inches taller than the leaves and bloom in May and June. The leaves turn red in autumn. Plant orange stonecrop in full sun or partial shade and a soil that is dry to slightly moist and well drained.

Keywords: spreading perennials, ground covers, low-growing perennials

About this Author

Regina Sass has been a writer for 10 years, penning articles for publications in the real estate and retail industries. Her online experience includes writing, advertising and editing for an educational website. Sass is a member of the Society of Professional Journalists.