How to Kill Raspberry Plants

Overview

Raspberry plants are often cultivated for their delicious berries, but they will take over a garden or yard like the weeds they really are. Whether you want to simply contain these plants or be rid of them altogether, you must be prepared to kill them when they start to spread. This can be tricky, given their thorny vines and how densely the plants grow, but with a little effort---and a good pair of gloves---you will be able to eliminate raspberry plants for good and reclaim your garden or yard.

Step 1

Put on a pair of sturdy garden gloves. Trim back the raspberry plants with garden clippers, but don't cut them down to the ground. Cut away excess vines so that you can easily see where each plant is growing. Place all the trimmed vines in a trash container.

Step 2

Identify each spot where a raspberry plant is actually growing, and trim any remaining vines away. Leave about 12 inches of vine on each plant.

Step 3

Dig up each raspberry plant with a spade or a shovel, going deep enough to remove all the roots of the plant. Dispose of the roots and vines in the trash container.

Step 4

Monitor the area where you dug up the raspberry plants for the next few weeks. Spot-treat any raspberry shoots with the glyphosate spray, which will kill the raspberry plants without hurting your grass. Target the problem plants and avoid spraying the surrounding area.

Things You'll Need

  • Garden gloves
  • Garden clippers
  • Trash container
  • Spade or shovel
  • Glyphosate spray

References

  • Hortiscope: Questions on Raspberries
  • GardenWise: Invaded by Raspberry Shoots
  • Organic Consumers Association: Death Sentence for Monsanto - Roundup Resistant Weeds
Keywords: kill raspberry plants, control raspberry plants, removing raspberry vines

About this Author

Carole VanSickle has over five years experience working with scientists and creative scholars to promote and explain their work. She is based in Atlanta, Ga., and specializes in scientific, medical and technical writing, SEO and educational content.