How to Grow a Lily Flower

Overview

Plant lily bulbs in the ground between mid-September and mid-October. The bright, colorful lily flowers bloom in early to late summer. Plant lily bulbs in loose, well-draining soil. Heavy, wet soil will cause the bulb to rot before the next season's growth begins. A soil pH of 6.5 is ideal for growing lilies, according to Iowa State University. (See reference 1) Lily flowers need six to eight hours of full sun each day.

Step 1

Dig a hole 6 to 8 inches deep, or three times as deep as the height of the bulb. Plant lily bulbs 12 inches apart. Space groups of three to five bulbs 5 feet apart for a pleasing arrangement.

Step 2

Place one bulb in each hole with the pointed end up and the round, bulbous end down. Cover with soil and pat firmly. Water the area until the soil is damp to a depth of 6 inches.

Step 3

Spread a 3- to 4-inch layer of mulch over the planted bulbs. Organic straw, untreated grass clippings or shredded leaves work well. Spread mulch in late fall before the first hard freeze.

Step 4

Pull back the mulch layer in the spring after the danger of frost has passed. Work carefully to avoid damaging any early starting lily shoots.

Step 5

Apply an application of phosphorous-rich fertilizer in the spring. The University of Minnesota Extension recommends a slow-release 5-10-10 fertilizer.

Step 6

Deadhead flowers when they are passing their prime. Leave green foliage on the plant until it dies back in winter, then remove it with sharp pruning shears.

Things You'll Need

  • Shovel
  • Mulch
  • Fertilizer
  • Pruning shears

References

  • Iowa State University: Growing Garden Lilies
  • University of Minnesota Extension: Selecting Lilies For Your Garden
Keywords: planting bulbs, fall planting, flower garden, bright flowers, summer blooming flowers

About this Author

Olivia Parker has been a freelance writer with Demand Studios for the past year, writing for Garden Guides and eHow. She has studied herbal and alternative medicine and worked as a landscape artist and gardener. Parker is currently pursuing a Bachelors of Arts from Boston University Online.