Lawn Care & Tick Prevention

Overview

Ticks carry diseases that infect humans and pets alike. Around 70 percent of people who develop the dreaded tick-borne Lyme disease contract it from a tick they picked up in their own lawn, according to the Rhode Island Department of Health. Ticks enjoy moist lawn conditions that are fairly cool. In many locations ticks are a year-round pest because they remain active in the yard if the temperature is above 45 degrees Fahrenheit.

Leaf Removal

Keep the lawn raked to remove fallen leaves. Leaves create a cool damp blanket over the lawn and are a favorite place for ticks to thrive. Do not rake the leaves in a large pile on the lawn and leave it because this is a favorite breeding location for ticks. Promptly dispose of raked leaves away from the lawn.

Mowing

Keep the grass mowed relatively short. Do not allow it to grow long or go to seed. The longer the grass, the cooler the environment close to the base of the grass, which becomes a favorite home for ticks to reside in.

Barrier

Create a barrier between the lawn and the woods where ticks reside. Lay down a few feet of bark mulch or wood chips between the woods and the grass. This helps keep ticks out of the lawn because they will not cross the hot, dry wood chips without an animal host to carry them.

Pesticide

Have a pest control expert spray the lawn using acaricide to control ticks. Acaricide offers control of the tick population in lawns by 68 to 100 percent, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Deer Control

Deer carry hundreds of ticks and they enjoy grazing on green lawns. Erect a fence around the yard to keep deer out. The University of California recommends a 7- or 8-foot fence to keep deer out of unwanted areas. If the yard has a slope, then the fence will need to be between 10 to 11 feet in height to prevent the deer from jumping it to forage on the grass.

Keywords: lawns and ticks, tick control, lawn tick control

About this Author

Kimberly Sharpe is a freelance writer with a diverse background. She has worked as a Web writer for the past four years. She writes extensively for Associated Content where she is both a featured home improvement contributor (with special emphasis on gardening) and a parenting contributor. She also writes for Helium. She has worked professionally in the animal care and gardening fields.