Evergreen Shrubs for Landscaping

There are several types of evergreen shrubs for landscaping. Choose evergreen shrubs based on your location, soil type and the amount of sunlight available in the landscaping. Additionally, choose shrubs that are resistant to local diseases and pests. Depending on the area of the country, a certain disease or pest might be less prevalent and not as likely to affect the shrubs.

William Penn Barberry

The William Penn barberry (Berberis x gladwynensis) is an evergreen that is dense, showy and has spines. It produces yellow flowers in the spring (usually April), and thrives in USDA hardiness zones 5 through 8. It prefers full sun and needs well-drained soil. Though it prefers moist soil, it is drought tolerant. It grows to a height of 4 feet and has a 6-foot spread. The leaves turn bronze-red in the fall. In August, the plant drops the flowers and produces red fruit that is tubular in shape. The fruit attracts songbirds.

Boxwoods

About 30 types of boxwood shrubs are used for landscape purposes, including the common (American) boxwood and the Japanese boxwood. All boxwoods need well-drained soil and should not be planted near downspouts or driplines (trees, houses). They will live in an area that gets full sun, but do better in partial shade. The pH of the soil must be 5.5 to 7.5. If the pH is not correct in the area you choose to plant the boxwoods, about 6 weeks prior to planting, amend the soil with lime, sulfur or fertilizer, depending on the results of the pH test. Use lime to amend soil that is too acidic. For soil that is too alkaline, use fertilizer to amend the soil.

Aucuba Japonica

The Aucuba japonica is an evergreen that grows in the southern areas of the United States, preferring USDA hardiness zones 7b through 9. It is often known as the Japanese laurel. It grows to a height of up to 8 feet with a spread of up to 4 feet, but can be kept pruned to 4 feet in height. It has moderate density, and the crown ranges from round to oval. The flowers are green and flower in the spring. The Aucuba japonica produces red flowers that tend to stay on the shrub.

Keywords: evergreen shrubs, barberry, boxwood

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Cayden Conor is a family law paralegal who writes on various subjects including dogs, cockatoos and cooking. She has over 15 years of experience as a paralegal, and has been writing professionally for three years. Conor has a paralegal degree and majored in criminology, computer science (programming emphasis) and education.