How to Grow Vegetables Inside a House

Overview

If you have limited outdoor space--or the desire to grow vegetable plants throughout the winter--you can grow vegetables indoors. You may choose to start plants from seed, but you get better and easier results if you buy mature vegetable plants. The best choices for an indoor garden include small-fruited tomatoes and peppers, radishes, lettuces and herbs, advises the University of Arizona Extension.

Step 1

Place a 1 inch layer of gravel in the bottom of 5 gallon (or larger) pots. Pour potting soil into the pots until three-quarters full.

Step 2

Scoop out a hole, with your hand, in the middle of the soil in each pot. Make the hole large enough to place the roots of the plant. The soil should cover the plant up to its base. Set the plants in each hole, spread the roots out and pack the soil around the roots and the base of the plants.

Step 3

Set a cage in the soil around the plants if you're growing vining vegetable varieties, such as tomatoes or peppers. Secure the cages in the soil by pressing the tines into the soil until you can push them no further into the soil.

Step 4

Water the plants daily with a fertilizer solution. Skip watering with the solution one day each week to give time for unused fertilizer to wash from the soil. Use a 12-24-12 or 10-20-10 formula, available at garden centers or nurseries. Follow the fertilizer instructions when mixing the solution. Store the mixed solution in a watering can. Water plants until the soil appears moist, not soggy.

Step 5

Set the vegetable plants in their pots in a sun-filled window or other location that receives adequate sunlight. Choose a south-facing window as they receive the most heat and sunlight. Rotate the pots each week, turning the plant slightly to ensure the plant receives proper sunlight on all sides.

Step 6

Harvest the vegetables when they're ripe, usually when fruits appear uniformly colored.

Things You'll Need

  • Gravel
  • Pot
  • Potting soil
  • Cage
  • Watering can
  • Fertilizer

References

  • Texas A&M Extension: Vegetable Gardening in Containers
  • The University of Arizona Extension: Vegetable Garden: Container Garden
Keywords: grow vegetables inside, growing vegetables indoors, container gardening indoors, indoor vegetable gardening

About this Author

Sommer Sharon has a bachelor's degree in IT/Web management from the University of Phoenix and owns a Web consulting business. With more than 12 years of experience in the publishing industry, her work has included "Better Homes and Gardens," "Ladies' Home Journal," "MORE," "Country Home," "Midwest Living," and "American Baby." Sharon now contributes her editorial background by writing for several Internet publications.