How to Buy Trees

Overview

Trees last for a long time. They are also a large investment in some cases, but with the correct plant may raise property values, according to the United State Department of Agriculture (USDA). Choosing the right tree for your space prevents damage to the surrounding plants and structures as the root system grows, and provides shade and privacy. When visiting a nursery, there are several factors you to consider.

Step 1

Measure the area you wish to plant the tree and decide how much space is really available. Ask your tree dealer how large the fully grown tree will be and determine whether it is suitable to your growing space.

Step 2

Test the soil in your area using a pH test, following the directions on the label to determine the soil quality in your area. Choose a tree that is suitable to your soil, or amend the area's soil quality appropriately.

Step 3

Determine whether the tree your are considering is suitable to your area, suggests the USDA. Local nurseries will likely carry only those trees suitable for your area. Check with a local extension office or nursery before buying any trees for delivery online.

Step 4

Check the roots of potted trees before buying them, suggests the Royal Horticulture Society, for any damage or disease.

Step 5

Look for signs of pests or disease on the branches of the tree before taking it away, says the Royal Horticulture Society. Ask whether there is a guarantee on the tree if any issues arise.

Things You'll Need

  • Measuring tape
  • Shovel
  • pH test

References

  • Royal Horticulture Society: How to Buy Shrubs and Trees
  • Oregon State Unviersity: The Care and Planting of Tree Seedlings in Your Woodland
  • United States Department of Agriculture: Tree Planting
Keywords: buy trees, tree advice, choosing a tree

About this Author

Cleveland Van Cecil is a freelancer writer specializing in technology. He has been a freelance writer for three years and has published extensively on eHow.com, writing articles on subjects as diverse as boat motors and hydroponic gardening. Van Cecil has a Bachelor of Arts in liberal arts from Baldwin-Wallace College.