How to Care for a Pineapple Plant Bloom

Overview

Pineapple plants are grown outdoors in areas with temperate climates, and they are cultivated just about everywhere else as houseplants. Given the right care, the plant will produce a single blossom from the center of its foliage between two and two-and-a-half years from the time of planting, according to the Family, Home and Garden Education Center of the University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension. The blossom will last approximately 14 days, after which a small fruit will begin growing from the center of the flower stalk. This fruit, notes the Horticultural Sciences Department of Texas A&M University, may take up to six months to mature.

Step 1

Insert a wood, plastic or metal stake approximately 6 to 8 inches into the ground adjacent to the pineapple plant once it produces a flower. The top of the stake should extend several inches above the pineapple plant itself. Depending on the variety, your pineapple plant may only be 2 or 3 feet tall.

Step 2

Tie the pineapple blossom's green or red stalk to the stake with garden twine, securing the twine right below the flower's base where the base meets the stalk. Make the tension of the twine loose enough so that the blossom can move a couple inches in each direction, but no more than that.

Step 3

Remove the twine and the stake once the pineapple fruit has ripened and you've harvested it by cutting it off at the base of the flower stem. The fruit is ready for harvesting when the rind has developed a yellowish orange color.

Things You'll Need

  • Stake
  • Garden twine

References

  • University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension: Houseplants from the Kitchen
  • Texas A&M University, Horticultural Sciences Department: Home Fruit Production: Pineapple
Keywords: growing pineapple plant, pineapple plant bloom, pineapple plant flower

About this Author

Josh Duvauchelle is an editor and journalist with more than 10 years' experience. His work has appeared in various magazines, including "Honolulu Magazine," which has more paid subscribers than any other magazine in Hawaii. He graduated with honors from Trinity Western University, holding a Bachelor of Arts in professional communications, and earned a certificate in applied leadership and public affairs from the Laurentian Leadership Centre.